Adolescents

Pediatric Oncology Center Justifies the Use of Medical Cannabis

Pediatric oncologists from Minnesota recently published an article justifying their use of medical cannabis as palliative care for their patients.

The majority of patients at the oncology center were approved for medical cannabis use during their first round of treatment, in order to immediately address the negative side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, pain, and cancer cachexia. The data provided from the center described much higher chemotherapy compliance rates among patients, and that patients have a much better quality of life when utilizing cannabis.

This article highlights a few promising trends and issues with using medical cannabis; one promising trend is the hope for cannabis to provide antitumor effects. Cannabis has been a subject of exploration for antitumor effects and it has shown promising results. But, there are many limitations to the few studies that have been published, leading the authors to defer any definitive conclusions. The center in Minnesota noted that many of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors were especially hopeful that cannabis would aid in curing them of cancer, second to utilizing the drug for nausea. This is a promising trend because it means the greater public is showing interest in the therapeutic possibilities of cannabis and their support and call for research will aid the drive for the federal rescheduling of marijuana. 

Also highlighted in this article is that, of all the patients certified to use medical cannabis, a subset of 24% never actually registered through the state to receive it. The authors have no firm explanation for these circumstances but seem to suspect that the $200 annual certification fee, on top of the cost for each additional dispensed product may be limiting of patients abilities to afford cannabis. Without the backing of the federal government, insurance companies are unable to cover medical cannabis. As the depth and reach of cannabis research grow, there are good reasons for patients to feel optimistic about medical cannabis.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Xb2O3N     inside the CED Foundation Archive


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Benjamin Caplan, MDPediatric Oncology Center Justifies the Use of Medical Cannabis
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Adolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%

Characteristics of Daily E-Cigarette Use and Acquisition Means Among a National Sample of Adolescents

From 2017 to 2018 the amount of middle school and high school electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users increased by 48% and 78% respectively. One of the first studies examining the association between e-cigarette characteristics and daily use among US adolescents is calling for comprehensive tobacco control efforts to reduce e-cigarette and nicotine addiction among adolescents. 38% of adolescent users report using their e-cigarette devices for cannabis which can be hazardous due to the lack of regulation. The potential risks associated with nicotine use and the dangerous misuse of these devices for other substances is putting youth’s health at risk.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Ff733m     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAdolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%
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Development of Cannabis-Based Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder and the endocannabinoid system

A recently published article serves as a call for research to be conducted to discover how cannabis could impact the management of bipolar disorder (BD). Presented in the article is a full review of the advantages and disadvantages of cannabis-based medicine in the treatment of BD and provides insight into possible mechanisms might affect the pathophysiology of the disorder. The insights listed within the article provide the rationale for examining the endocannabinoid system, specifically the cannabinoid receptor 2, with the hopes of finding therapeutic targets for mood control associated with BD.  

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2FfJXK6      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDDevelopment of Cannabis-Based Treatment for Bipolar Disorder
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Cost-effectiveness of treating pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy

Cannabis-based treatments may reduce seizures among children with drug-resistant epilepsy, but are these treatments cost-effective? 

Economic evaluations of cannabis treatments are needed, and they should address issues including weight-gain over time, switching or discontinuation of treatments, the effectiveness of interventions, and long-term success, beyond the duration of available clinical studies.

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2INWAOJ    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCost-effectiveness of treating pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy
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Analyses of Cannabinoid Signaling in the Immune System Highlights Key Questions, Challenges, and Future Directions

Targeting Cannabinoid Signaling in the Immune System: “High”-ly Exciting Questions, Possibilities, and Challenges

A meta-analysis concerning the role of cannabinoid signaling in immune system regulations revealed current therapeutic benefits, challenges for future research, and exciting new directions. Among the current research, cannabinoids have already been found to suppress inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases, especially in multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Type-1 Diabetes, and Crohn’s Disease. Future cannabis-based therapies aim to improve immune responses to organ donation, bone marrow transplants, and skin grafts. The analysis includes challenges facing future cannabis research such as potential side effects and legal status.  

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/31ArGR9      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAnalyses of Cannabinoid Signaling in the Immune System Highlights Key Questions, Challenges, and Future Directions
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Variations in Genes Influences Cannabis’ Acute Effects on Behavior

CNR1 and FAAH variation and affective states induced by marijuana smoking

A recent study has revealed that variations within cannabinoid receptor 1 (CBR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) influences cannabis’ acute effects on affect. Variations of CBR1 and FAAH are known to be associated with cannabis dependence. The current study now adds that the variations in genes also affect an individual’s behavior when ingesting cannabis. The results of this study provide useful information for understanding an individual’s motivation for marijuana use, as well as risks and associated behaviors.

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/31Ce9Za     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVariations in Genes Influences Cannabis’ Acute Effects on Behavior
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Vaping cannabis among adolescents: prevalence and associations with tobacco use from a cross-sectional study in the USA

Out of 2,835 high school students from North Carolina, 272 students (or 9.6%) reported ever vaping cannabis. Interestingly, the odds of ever vaping cannabis were significantly higher among males (11.0%) compared with females (8.2%), and significantly higher among non-Hispanic white students (11.3%) compared with non-Hispanic black students (5.0%).

It’s clear that white males are the most likely to have ever vaping cannabis. Why might minority students engage less with recreational drug use?

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2L6zYdv     inside the CED Foundation Archive

Benjamin Caplan, MDVaping cannabis among adolescents: prevalence and associations with tobacco use from a cross-sectional study in the USA
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Cannabinoid Receptors Working with Opioid Receptors

The locus coeruleus is a spot in the human brainstem that is integral to our responses to stress, panic, wakefulness, and sleep-wake transitions. Both the cannabinoid receptors and opioid receptors in the locus coeruleus have a synergistic relationship that, once the medical system begins to incorporate more education about cannabinoids, just might change how physicians prescribe pain medication. The interactions of the two receptor types provide a mechanism that could easily and conveniently improve pain control, provide treatments for addiction, and will likely aid those experiencing symptoms of withdrawal. Research focusing on the treatment of opioid addiction with cannabis is ongoing… but hindered by the legal status of cannabis.

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2MMeYeK    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoid Receptors Working with Opioid Receptors
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Capsaicin Cream Treats Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome in Adolescents

Capsaicin Cream for Treatment of CHS adolescent

Researchers have found that capsaicin cream is an effective and safe method of treating cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) in adolescents. Capsaicin cream has previously been shown to be effective at treating CHS in adults but adolescents have previously been treated with haloperidol, a drug known to have serious side effects. Capsaicin cream offers a much safer and more cost-effective method of treatment for adolescents.

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2F8Gtcc      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCapsaicin Cream Treats Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome in Adolescents
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Adolescent Executive Dysfunction in Daily Life: Relationships to Risks, Brain Structure and Substance Use

Researchers assessed 817 youth (aged 12 to 21) who previously participated in the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in Adolescence study. They found that 123 subjects (15.2%) had used cannabis in the past year, and that cannabis use impaired inhibitory control, emotional control, and task planning.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2L0aMWa     inside the CED Foundation Archive

Benjamin Caplan, MDAdolescent Executive Dysfunction in Daily Life: Relationships to Risks, Brain Structure and Substance Use
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