Antioxidant

Video: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures

One of the terrific realities of modern Cannabis is that it is possible, and often quite simple, to make effective products at home. With suitable education and access to testing facilities, the soil, nutrients, and plant growth can be supported at home, lab-tested for make-up and potency, as well as safety-checked for potential microscopic contaminants, and ultimately, individualized medicine can be created right at home!

Here is a sample instructional for just one way that cannabis tincture can be made at home. There are countless others and hopefully, many that are yet to be discovered!

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures
read more

Genes in the Endocannabinoid and Opioid Systems may Provide Biomarkers of Obesity

Title: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence for a Distinct Regulation of Mu Opioid and Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Genes Expression in Obesity

Researchers have recently found that alterations of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1) and mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1)  contribute to the development of obesity. This phenomenon was shown in rat models who were given a high-fat diet and humans currently dealing with obesity. Due to the possibility of the up-regulation of CNR1 and OPRM1 providing a mechanism for developing the obesity phenotype, those two genes could serve as biomarkers for obesity. Fortunately, the up-regulation of CNR1 and OPRM1 is reversible and may also provide a target for combatting obesity and encouraging weight loss in obese individuals. 

Highlighted here are the interactions of the endocannabinoid and opioid systems. Contradictory evidence concerning the interaction of the two systems has come out in recent years making it difficult to come to any conclusions. The endocannabinoid system has been thought to provide a safe and effective method for combatting the opioid crisis. Opioids are highly addictive and dangerous, but they are an efficient way to minimize pain which has kept them in mainstream medicine. Opioids have led to countless overdoses in recent decades causing researchers to search for a more ethical option for pain relief. Cannabis has a much better safety profile, poses no risk of overdose, and offers a welcome change of pace to traditional choices. Conclusive research is still needed to confirm, and reconfirm the details.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2xOhoPE     inside the CED Foundation Archive

Benjamin Caplan, MDGenes in the Endocannabinoid and Opioid Systems may Provide Biomarkers of Obesity
read more

Medicinal Value of Citrus Peels

Citrus peels waste as a source of value-added compounds: extraction and quantification of bioactive polyphenols

Previous analysis of citrus peels has demonstrated high content of biologically active polyphenols, with significant quantities of flavonoids and phenolic acids present. Both these compounds have been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, anti-allergic, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, neuroprotective, and antimicrobial properties.

A recent paper points out that citrus peel waste alone makes up nearly 50% of wet fruit mass discarded as waste and proposes extraction of polyphenols to minimize waste. The bioactive substances in peels can be used in dietary supplements, cosmetics, food products, and pharmaceutical products.

Citrus peels contain significant polyphenols, compounds which have health benefits ranging from antioxidant to anticancer. Polyphenols are also found in large quantities in cannabis, undoubtedly contributing to it many of its well-known health benefits. 

Image result for citrus peel eating

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2F8bPja     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDMedicinal Value of Citrus Peels
read more

Flavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador

Chemical composition and Antioxidant Activity of the Main Fruits, Tubers and Legumes Traditionally Consumed in the Andean Regions of Ecuador as a Source of Health-Promoting Compounds

Many fruits grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador have been the center of medical and consumer interests due to their health benefits. Many plants from the region have been used, historically, as both food sources and therapeutic agents. In response to limited studies on the antioxidant capacity and bioactive compounds that make up these food sources, researchers analyzed many commonly consumed fruits, tubers, and legumes. These demonstrated high total flavonoid, phenolic, and anthocyanin content, which can contribute to high antioxidant potential. A range of antioxidant potentials exist, and many fruits possess these high antioxidant potentials.

Note: A high flavonoid content in many food sources grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador contributes to high antioxidant potential in many of these fruits, tubers, and legumes. Many plants, including cannabis, have high flavonoid content that gives them many viable therapeutic applications.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2YCwqDN     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador
read more

Between Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials

Characteristics of the bitter and sweet honey from Algeria Mediterranean coast

Previous research on honey and its historical use in traditional medicine has pointed toward its therapeutic application for the immune system, anemia, and heart function, among other conditions.

Two kinds of honey harvested from the Algeria Mediterranean coast, so-called poly-floral sweet honey and uni-floral bitter honey, have demonstrated their many medicinal uses. In a comparative analysis of the two kinds of honey, bitter honey had higher flavonoid content, lower sucrose content, and higher total polyphenols and tannins levels, giving it an increased antioxidant potential over sweet honey.

Additional Point: Factors including a higher flavonoid content in uni-floral bitter content gives it an improved antioxidant potential over poly-floral sweet honey. This makes for a wide variety of clinical benefits, including treatment of anemia, colon cancer, improved immune function, and more.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2FXPipE     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:


Benjamin Caplan, MDBetween Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials
read more

One theory for why cannabis affects people differently

Something still not entirely understood is why cannabis affects people differently. A study looking at THC interactions in the brain show that rewarding and adverse effects are produced by anatomically different areas. Individual experiences likely differ due to genetic variation.

http://bit.ly/2Jnjg8q 

Benjamin Caplan, MDOne theory for why cannabis affects people differently
read more