Anxiety

Video: Cannabinoid Intervention for PTSD: Where to Next?

The endocannabinoid system has long been recognized as a promising target for PTSD treatment.

Here, a 2018 literature review summarizes the risks and benefits of cannabis as a treatment option. Watch our video adaptation, and review the source literature, below:


View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2XgnrXn     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Cannabinoid Intervention for PTSD: Where to Next?
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Non-Psychoactive Cannabis Treatments for Chronic Muscle Pain

Cannabidiol, cannabinol and their combinations act as peripheral analgesics in a rat model of myofascial pain

Some of the non-psychoactive cannabinoids in cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN), have recently been found to produce analgesic effects (pain relief) in mouse models. A combination of CBD and CBN causes a decrease in sensitization of muscles, leading researchers to believe the combination could provide relief for those suffering from chronic muscle pain disorders. Cannabis products are already being prescribed for chronic pain disorders and this new study provides evidence that cannabis-based medicine can also be applicable when treating chronic pain associated with disorders such as fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2L1AF8d    inside the CED Foundation Archive

Benjamin Caplan, MDNon-Psychoactive Cannabis Treatments for Chronic Muscle Pain
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Sex differences in the anxiety effects of cannabinoids

In overarching trends, one pattern that is seen in the medical literature is a greater tendency for males to be more likely to develop drug abuse disorders than female counterparts, whilst females are more likely to develop anxiety disorders than male counterparts.

Of course, these trends are merely observational patterns in the current literature, which represents a biased perspective of biased subjects, and certainly not etched in stone. Further, many people do not conform to one pre-determined organization system as simple as gender to help educate whether they would be likely to develop drug dependence or anxiety, and even others don’t conform to a single gender. So, a sizeable grain of salt must be taken with what we understand from this literature.

That given, the relevant punch line here is what role might cannabis play in inducing or reducing anxiety across sexes, and how does cannabis might relate to addiction/dependence.

We are still at early stages of these important questions, but one recent study found, that female rats were significantly more likely than male rats to experience anxiety when given large doses of cannabis.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2J15XdL     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDSex differences in the anxiety effects of cannabinoids
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Cannabidiol Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

Cannabidiol: a hope to treat non‑motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Cannabidiol (CBD) has recently been postulated as an ideal drug to address the treatment of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) due to its multifaceted mechanism of action. The plethora of effects of CBD includes anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, anxiolytic, and antipsychotic actions, which improve non-motor symptoms of PD and lift the quality of life for patients coping with the illness. Further research is recommended to garner support for FDA approval.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2KXTb0Y     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabidiol Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease
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Development of Cannabis-Based Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder and the endocannabinoid system

A recently published article serves as a call for research to be conducted to discover how cannabis could impact the management of bipolar disorder (BD). Presented in the article is a full review of the advantages and disadvantages of cannabis-based medicine in the treatment of BD and provides insight into possible mechanisms might affect the pathophysiology of the disorder. The insights listed within the article provide the rationale for examining the endocannabinoid system, specifically the cannabinoid receptor 2, with the hopes of finding therapeutic targets for mood control associated with BD.  

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2FfJXK6      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDDevelopment of Cannabis-Based Treatment for Bipolar Disorder
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The Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain

A Budding Source of Targets for Treating Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain ECS

The cannabinoid system provides momentum to develop cannabinoid-based medications to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain as researchers continue to find promising therapeutic targets. These new targets may lead to the formation of novel pain-relief medications that may serve well to alleviate pain for those suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, and fibromyalgia. Cannabis-based pain medicine is also being researched for opioid-sparing effects and effectiveness in reducing the necessary dose of opioids.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:  http://bit.ly/2FfLorA        inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain
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Video: Cannabis and Multiple Sclerosis

A 2019 literature review summarizes the findings on cannabis use for patients with multiple sclerosis. Cannabis has been shown to aid a number of symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis, including chronic pain, spasticity, and problems with sleep. To learn more, check out our video adaptation below:

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2IJAqNz    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Cannabis and Multiple Sclerosis
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Cannabis constituent synergy in a mouse neuropathic pain model

In a mice-model study, researchers found that low dose THC:CBD might successfully treat neuropathic pain. 

Neuropathic pain is pain caused by damage to the somatosensory nervous system. Neuropathic pain may be associated with abnormal sensations or pain from normally non-painful stimuli, for example, Phantom Limb Syndrome.

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2Fk0yw7      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis constituent synergy in a mouse neuropathic pain model
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THC Has Potential for Treating Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

In a crossover trial of 39 patients with Alzheimer’s disease, treatment with nabilone (a synthetic THC analog) was associated with significant improvement in agitation and, remarkably, cognition. Further studies should examine the effects of both THC and CBD in patients with Alzheimer’s disease because anxiety is common in dementia and may exacerbate agitation. 

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2IH2BfX      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDTHC Has Potential for Treating Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease
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Variations in Genes Influences Cannabis’ Acute Effects on Behavior

CNR1 and FAAH variation and affective states induced by marijuana smoking

A recent study has revealed that variations within cannabinoid receptor 1 (CBR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) influences cannabis’ acute effects on affect. Variations of CBR1 and FAAH are known to be associated with cannabis dependence. The current study now adds that the variations in genes also affect an individual’s behavior when ingesting cannabis. The results of this study provide useful information for understanding an individual’s motivation for marijuana use, as well as risks and associated behaviors.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/31Ce9Za     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDVariations in Genes Influences Cannabis’ Acute Effects on Behavior
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