Behavior change

Cannabinoid Receptors Regulating the Function of Opioid Receptors

Constitutive Activity of the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Regulates the Function of Co-expressed Mu Opioid Receptors

Summary info:

Cannabinoid receptors have been found to regulate the function of co-expressed mu-opioid receptors. Researchers have found data that indicates the constitutive activity within the cannabinoid system reduced the capacity of expressed mu-opioid receptor functions. This research brings to light the possible benefits of modulating opioid consumption with  cannabis-based medicines. 

Dr Caplan Discussion Points:

One of the interesting discussion points in this paper is a close look at the effects of the CB1 receptor and its capacity to reduce the function of some mu-opioid receptors, through a mechanism different than naloxone. This suggests some appropriate optimism for cannabinoid-based tools in the battle against the worldwide opioid epidemic.

Learn more at http://bit.ly/2wRsbbt 

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2Hqu8Bn      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoid Receptors Regulating the Function of Opioid Receptors
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Natural & Cannabinoid Changes in Dopamine: A key to the psychosis question?

Comparing dopaminergic dynamics in the dorsolateral striatum between adolescent and adult rats- Effect of an acute dose of WIN55212-2

Brief summary:

A recent study has exposed an age-dependent mechanism within the dopaminergic system that relies on cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Adult and adolescent dopamine levels were examined in the presence of a CB1 agonist and increased levels of extracellular dopamine were found in adolescents. This study reveals the different effects cannabis-based medicine has depended on the age of the patient and warrants future research to ensure cannabis has the desired therapeutic effect on patients.   

Dr Caplan Discussion Points:

This adds a helpful layer of insight to the way an animal model of dopamine changes over time, as well as its interaction with exogenous cannabinoids. This sheds light on the natural evolution of the dopamine control system (irrespective of how it interacts with endocannabinoids), and it also points to how cannabinoids may be involved.

This helps to educate the discussion about how psychosis and cannabis use may interact. There is a long-held understanding that dopamine abnormalities in the specific parts of the brain (mesolimbic and prefrontal brain regions) exist in schizophrenia. More recently, research has also strongly suggested that other neurotransmitters, including glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, and serotonin are also involved in schizophrenia (and, coincidentally, there is also interaction with these other neurotransmitters from various components of cannabis). Nonetheless, this study simply suggests that, by nature, basal dopamine levels increase during adolescence. Also, the study points out that some cannabinoids boost basal levels too. It seems logical to suggest that excessive dopamine may create a problematic force of additional tipping toward illness, within individuals for whom a congenital predisposition toward illness exists.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2HpWqM5     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDNatural & Cannabinoid Changes in Dopamine: A key to the psychosis question?
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Video: 4 major risks of recreational cannabis use

Though cannabis has many medical benefits, using the drug without professional guidance can cause serious harm. Watch this video to learn about 4 major risks associated with recreational cannabis use

Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: 4 major risks of recreational cannabis use
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CED Foundation data share drive

This week, CED Foundation is sharing 558 reviews on the medicinal effects of a variety of terpenes (234 added just today)

The drive is free for all to educate. Search. Read. Share. Teach yourself. Help everyone Evolve.

http://bit.ly/33f9a1n

The full drive: tinyurl.com/DrCaplan

Benjamin Caplan, MDCED Foundation data share drive
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Video: Controversial Questions in Cannabis Today

As cannabis finds its place back into modern human culture quickly, there is much still to be learned. As the science grows and adapts to modern need and expectations, the “can we” may be out-pacing the “should we.” On the other hand, there are circumstances where modern culture really “should be” and is handicapped by years of misinformed stigma.

Here, a few controversial questions about cannabis:

Should teachers be allowed to use cannabis around children? 

Should spiritual leaders be allowed to use cannabis, as they have for millennia?

Should taxi drivers be allowed to use cannabis on the job?

Should pilots be allowed to use cannabis?

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Controversial Questions in Cannabis Today
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