Canada

Student-Athletes are at an Increased Risk for Binge Drinking and Substance Use

Title: Psychological correlates and binge drinking behaviours among Canadian youth- a cross-sectional analysis of the mental health pilot data from the COMPASS study

A recent study has examined data from the COMPASS program and found that student-athletes in Canada were more likely to engage in binge-drinking and illicit substance use. Researchers focussed on the measure of flourishing, defined as an overall healthy mental state and emotional connectedness, and how flourishing related to concerning drinking and substance use behavior. Student-athletes were found to be the most at risk for binge-drinking, defined as consuming 5 or more drinks in a single session, and those more likely to binge-drink were also more likely to co-use illicit substances. This research provides evidence for the formation of targeted prevention programs.

Cannabis use is banned among athletes by most sports organizations. Cannabis appeals to athletes considering the many different consumption methods, allowing discreet consumption and personalization with variable potential opportunities for relief. Cannabinoids are generally naturally occurring substances unless clearly manufactured, and have been shown to be beneficial for post-workout recovery, muscle soreness, anxiety, sleep, and relaxation. All of those symptoms, including the emotionally driven ones, are common among student-athletes who often feel an immense amount of pressure to perform in competition. As in most other areas of modern culture, Cannabidiol (CBD) finds itself in a grey area for most sports organizations’ substance regulations given that it is not intoxicating and readily available with a notable safety profile. Even if cannabis is not federally legal, CBD is so widely available that many athletes are embracing it, in lieu of more dangerous, or potentially addictive, medications.

Tweet: A recent study has examined data from the #COMPASS program and found that #studentathletes in Canada were more likely to engage in #binge-drinking and illicit substance use. Read this and other linked studies:

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2XSoIUQ     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDStudent-Athletes are at an Increased Risk for Binge Drinking and Substance Use
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Video: Medical Cannabis Around the Globe & Across Centuries

Throughout the ages, from health & wellness, religious rituals, and textile applications to the entertainment and social elements, cannabis has been a vital part of multiple sectors of human culture.

For millions, the modern cannabis revival is a welcome return home to a core element that has been missing for years.

 

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2l4Vgxq    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Medical Cannabis Around the Globe & Across Centuries
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Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

Title of study: Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

After legalization in 2018, many Canadian provinces implemented “zero tolerance” policies for drivers who have THC in their systems. But a new study from the University of British Columbia suggests that Canada’s drug-impaired driving laws may be unnecessarily strict. According to researchers, there is no link between THC levels below 5ng/mL and increased risk of car accidents.

Note: Considering the potentially grave risk to life and health for modern culture to make the wrong interpretation of the potential dangers of the effects of cannabis consumption on driving, it is critical for the industry to approach the circumstances with delicacy and diligence. Ideally, everyone involved will be motivated to learn as much as possible about the impact of cannabis on the risks of operating machinery and all will follow a cautious approach which will minimize the risk to all. To that end, it is important to consider and reconcile evidence from multiple perspectives.

The article:

“New study suggests low levels of THC in blood do not increase risk of car crash” https://www.straight.com/cannabis/1256476/new-study-suggests-low-levels-thc-blood-do-not-increase-risk-car-crash#

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2IVhSJY    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study
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Characteristics of Canadians likely to try or increase cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes

In October 2018, recreational cannabis became legal in Canada. And in 2019, researchers asked nearly 20 thousand Canadians over the age of 15 about their cannabis habits. The survey found that 1 in 5 Canadians plan on trying or increasing cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes, particularly those who are younger, who have used cannabis in the past 3 months, and who have a higher income. To ensure responsible cannabis use and informed decision-making, clinicians and policy-makers should pay close attention to these higher risk populations.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2Lfduay      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCharacteristics of Canadians likely to try or increase cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes
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Guidelines for Canada’s cannabis edibles tight, but also vague

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/guidelines-for-canadas-cannabis-edibles-tight-but-also-vague

Months after the decision to legalize cannabis, Canadian lawmakers work to regulate the packaging and advertising of cannabis products. The new guidelines forbid the mixing of alcohol and THC and also ensure that products are not “appealing to a young person.”

Benjamin Caplan, MDGuidelines for Canada’s cannabis edibles tight, but also vague
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