Citizen Science

Medical Marijuana Offers Benefits Comparable to Prescription Medication, Without the Side Effects

Title: Preferences for Medical Marijuana over Prescription Medications Among Persons Living with Chronic Conditions: Alternative, Complementary, and Tapering Uses

In a survey of 30 patients using medical cannabis for a range of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, hepatitis C, PTSD, among others, patients reported an array of benefits they have reaped from cannabis use. Patients successfully used cannabis in several ways: as an alternative to prescription medication, complementarily with prescription medicine, and to gradually replace use of prescription medication.

Benefits described by participants included the effects of cannabis lasting longer than that of opioids, lower risk of addiction, fewer side-effects. Patients also saw their sleep, anxiety, appetite, and adverse reactions improve with the use of medical cannabis. Larger, more controlled studies may suggest cannabis more affirmatively as an alternative or complementary therapy with prescription medications.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2wqDDdQ     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMedical Marijuana Offers Benefits Comparable to Prescription Medication, Without the Side Effects
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Cannabis: Vaporizing vs Smoking

Smoking cannabis brings toxins and unhealthy combustion byproducts into the body. With temps in the ~2000’F range for flame, burning flower incinerates a large portion of the product being consumed. As the distance from the point of flame grows, temperatures are lower, and cannabinoids are vaporizing, in addition to being burned by the flame. Over time, as heating technology has improved, there is no longer a need for blasting temperatures way beyond what the material can safely sustain before turning to tar and ash.

Beyond developed habits of consumption, social familiarity, and simplicity of use, one of the reasons many enjoy combustion is the other effects of heat. As with any human contact with extreme heat, blood rushes to the source of heat, and this may present a platform, through which cannabinoids may enter the bloodstream more quickly. The extravagant heat is also aerosolizing many more cannabis compounds than vaporization temperatures typically support, so the effect of flame is often felt to be more intense.

Vaporizing cannabis, however, is less likely to introduce mutations in the polyphenol compounds found in abundance within cannabis, and some of the mutations create terrible molecules known to be caustic and destructive.

If the medical rationale for vaporizing (over combustion) is not convincing, please consider the financial argument: Though purchasing a vaporizer may be costly, it’s a smart investment that could save money in the long run. Learn more by watching this video:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis: Vaporizing vs Smoking
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Evaluating the visual cues of quality for cannabis flower

Ever wonder if your cannabis is high or low quality? These visual clues could help you find out

Benjamin Caplan, MDEvaluating the visual cues of quality for cannabis flower
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How to store cannabis

If stored properly, cannabis can last up to two years.
We are starting to see ground-breaking technology rising in the industry, including filtration of humidity built into packaging, as well as permeable membranes that support the wise guarding of both hydration and terpene/flavonoid concentration.

https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/how-long-is-my-cannabis-good-for-leaflys-guide-to-storing-cannabi

Benjamin Caplan, MDHow to store cannabis
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Video: The Endocannabinoid System

A simplified overview of the human side of the human-cannabis interaction system!

Built from the growing mountain of literature inside the CED Foundation Medical Cannabis Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: The Endocannabinoid System
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False Memory Formation Does not Differ between Cannabis Users and Controls

Title: False memory formation in cannabis users- a field study

This new study has revealed that although cannabis use does not increase the rate of false memory acquisition, cannabis use did increase the uncertainty of participants. It was also determined that intoxicated cannabis users were less accurate when recognizing true events, providing evidence that cannabis intoxication hinders memory formation.

This research provides a basis of knowledge for those interviewing people under the influence of cannabis for legal proceedings to determine the validity of their statements. If cannabis intoxication increases the uncertainty and liberal answers provided by users then their statements should be used sparingly or well-corroborated. 


This research highlights the importance of understanding cannabis for legal proceedings. More and more state governments are legalizing medical and recreational cannabis, each year, increasing the amount of those eligible to legally consume cannabis. As cannabis use continues to climb in popularity, witnesses or others interviewed in legal settings may not provide the most accurate information. Acute cannabis use should be a consideration related to legal proceedings so that the users’ statements can be weighed appropriately.  

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2Jt6eWY    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDFalse Memory Formation Does not Differ between Cannabis Users and Controls
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Cannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia

Opioid-Sparing Effects of Cannabinoids on Morphine Analgesia- Participation of CB1 and CB2 Receptors

Researchers have recently provided evidence that synthetic cannabinoids are able to work synergistically with morphine to provide maximum pain relief while limiting opioid doses.

In an effort to control the current opioid epidemic researchers have been looking into the possible benefits of cannabinoids due to the interaction of the opioid and endocannabinoid systems. The results of this study showed that various synthetic cannabinoids (WIN and GP1a) were able to work synergistically with morphine in two separate pain models to maximize analgesic effects. Further evidence is still needed to validate these claims before patient use, but this paper provides further evidence that medical cannabis may help put an end to the opioid crisis. 

Highlighted in this paper is the lingering uncertainty of exact mechanisms within the endocannabinoid system. The authors of this article are left without definite answers as to whether or not the analgesic effect is mediated completely through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or if cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is also involved. Research into cannabinoids is slow within the United States, as there are currently only privately funded studies. This severely limits the medical community from a full understanding. The better a system is understood, the more concrete answers can be found. Critics may never support the rescheduling of cannabis but without moving cannabis to a Schedule II or III, it remains impossible to back even their claims. 

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Xh5PQl     inside the CED Foundation Archive


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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia
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Sex differences in the anxiety effects of cannabinoids

In overarching trends, one pattern that is seen in the medical literature is a greater tendency for males to be more likely to develop drug abuse disorders than female counterparts, whilst females are more likely to develop anxiety disorders than male counterparts.

Of course, these trends are merely observational patterns in the current literature, which represents a biased perspective of biased subjects, and certainly not etched in stone. Further, many people do not conform to one pre-determined organization system as simple as gender to help educate whether they would be likely to develop drug dependence or anxiety, and even others don’t conform to a single gender. So, a sizeable grain of salt must be taken with what we understand from this literature.

That given, the relevant punch line here is what role might cannabis play in inducing or reducing anxiety across sexes, and how does cannabis might relate to addiction/dependence.

We are still at early stages of these important questions, but one recent study found, that female rats were significantly more likely than male rats to experience anxiety when given large doses of cannabis.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2J15XdL     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDSex differences in the anxiety effects of cannabinoids
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The Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain

A Budding Source of Targets for Treating Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain ECS

The cannabinoid system provides momentum to develop cannabinoid-based medications to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain as researchers continue to find promising therapeutic targets. These new targets may lead to the formation of novel pain-relief medications that may serve well to alleviate pain for those suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, and fibromyalgia. Cannabis-based pain medicine is also being researched for opioid-sparing effects and effectiveness in reducing the necessary dose of opioids.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:  http://bit.ly/2FfLorA        inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain
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Cannabidiol May Provide Novel Treatment for Rare Ovarian Cancer

Dramatic response to Laetrile and cannabidiol (CBD) oil in a patient with metastatic low grade serous ovarian carcinoma

A recent case study has examined a patient’s response to the consumption of cannabidiol (CBD) as a treatment for a rare type of ovarian cancer. Rather than participate in chemotherapy, which has been shown to only be effective in 5% of patients with low grade serous ovarian carcinoma, an 81-year-old decided to take a combination of amygdalin and CBD. Although CBD has only been shown to have effective anti-cancer properties in murine models the featured patient reported a significant decrease in tumor size, revealing that CBD may, in fact, be an effective treatment for patients looking into alternative care methods.

Although proven ineffective, the use of amygdalin highlights alternative therapies derived from naturally occurring chemicals found in common plants. Flavonoids and terpenes are chemical components of cannabis plants, also found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, that are just now being investigated for their therapeutic benefits. The results of those inquiries may prove useful for similar patients suffering from illnesses that are resistant to the usual treatments.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2L9pCJZ      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabidiol May Provide Novel Treatment for Rare Ovarian Cancer
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