Driving

The Endocannabinoid System’s Effect on the Cerebellum is a Drawback for Anti-Inflammatory Meds

Title: Monoacylglycerol lipase blockade impairs fine motor coordination and triggers cerebellar neuroinflammation through cyclooxygenase-2

Researchers are constantly considering how cannabis may impact the human brain, for better or worse. A recently published work points out a negative effect on the cerebellum, caused by the inhibition of the main enzyme that is used to break down the endocannabinoid “2- arachidonoylglycerol” (2-AG). By inhibiting the degradation of 2-AG, more of the endocannabinoid is allowed to remain in, and act upon, the human nervous system. This abundance of 2-AG results in reduced synthesis of prostaglandins, which produces an anti-inflammatory effect.

Unfortunately, the abundance of 2-AG also results in motor coordination deficits related to the effect on the cerebellum, but the addition of a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor (commonly found in many over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications) reverses these cerebellar deficits. 

This highlights the far-reaching capabilities of the endocannabinoid system and at least one powerful angle where researchers could develop medications to indirectly impact the endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids are still a politically hot topic, but synthesizing drugs that alter the level of endogenous cannabinoids available in the body is an ideal way to study the endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic benefits, without engaging with the red tape that surrounds cannabis. The receptors mechanisms for the endocannabinoid system certainly warrants further investigation.

Tweet: Researchers have recently revealed the negative effects on the #cerebellum caused by the inhibition of the main enzyme utilized for the degradation of the #endocannabinoid 2- arachidonoylglycerol (#2-AG). Learn more at

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Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Endocannabinoid System’s Effect on the Cerebellum is a Drawback for Anti-Inflammatory Meds
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Incidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations

Title: A review of drug abuse in recently reported cases of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) in Asia, USA, and Europe

A recent literature review has found that the current driving regulations in Asia, Europe, and the US have not prevented cases of driving under the influence of drugs. The authors observed steady trends of incidences of driving under the influence in all three regions, despite legislature specifically enacted against such actions. In the literature, there is a consistent recommendation that drivers should be regularly tested, especially in the case of an accident, in order to gather more data on the role of drugs in traffic accidents. 


This review highlights the different illicit drugs that contribute to traffic accidents, depending on the region of the world. Cannabis is legal in certain areas of Europe, whereas it is still considered an illicit substance here in the US, and many other locations, worldwide. Looking at the differences in severity or circumstance of the accidents between the type of illicit drug used may provide data to create more beneficial regulations for each country. As the legal status of cannabis continues to evolve, and it becomes more common to find drivers on the road who have consumed a minimal amount of cannabis, new screening techniques will likely be developed to help the culture establish what it considers an “acceptable amount” of blood-borne cannabinoids to be.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDIncidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations
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Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

Title of study: Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

After legalization in 2018, many Canadian provinces implemented “zero tolerance” policies for drivers who have THC in their systems. But a new study from the University of British Columbia suggests that Canada’s drug-impaired driving laws may be unnecessarily strict. According to researchers, there is no link between THC levels below 5ng/mL and increased risk of car accidents.

Note: Considering the potentially grave risk to life and health for modern culture to make the wrong interpretation of the potential dangers of the effects of cannabis consumption on driving, it is critical for the industry to approach the circumstances with delicacy and diligence. Ideally, everyone involved will be motivated to learn as much as possible about the impact of cannabis on the risks of operating machinery and all will follow a cautious approach which will minimize the risk to all. To that end, it is important to consider and reconcile evidence from multiple perspectives.

The article:

“New study suggests low levels of THC in blood do not increase risk of car crash” https://www.straight.com/cannabis/1256476/new-study-suggests-low-levels-thc-blood-do-not-increase-risk-car-crash#

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study
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How to prevent inappropriate teen use?

Especially in Colorado and Washington, people are taking note of teens’ use and access to potent marijuana, and many are concerned that there are not enough measures in place to prevent this. Newly legalized states should look into this before it becomes a national issue. https://wapo.st/2Fgmto9

Benjamin Caplan, MDHow to prevent inappropriate teen use?
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Alcohol Hangover Has Detrimental Impact Upon Both Executive Function and Prospective Memory

In a study that excluded cannabis users, researchers found that alcohol hangovers significantly impair both executive function (paying attention, regulating emotions, etc.) and prospective memory (remembering future plans).

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAlcohol Hangover Has Detrimental Impact Upon Both Executive Function and Prospective Memory
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Effects of Cannabis are More Marked in Occasional Rather than Chronic Cannabis Users

Effect of Smoked Cannabis on Vigilance and Accident Risk Using Simulated Driving in Occasional and Chronic Users and the Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationship

In a study comparing the short-term effects of cannabis consumption on occasional and chronic cannabis users, occasional users were found to have slower reaction times, experience effects sooner, and have cannabis persist in their bloodstream longer than among chronic cannabis users. Both occasional and chronic users experienced impaired reaction times that affected their performance in a driving simulation. Both chronic and occasional marijuana users should be cognizant of the amount of time in which they are impaired following cannabis consumption and abstain from driving.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDEffects of Cannabis are More Marked in Occasional Rather than Chronic Cannabis Users
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