Flavonoids

Flavonoid Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer?

“Study on cannabis chemical as a treatment for pancreatic cancer may have ‘major impact,’ Harvard researcher says”

The article:

https://yhoo.it/2TQw0bo


The Science:

Abstract:

“Pancreatic cancer is particularly refractory to modern therapies, with a 5-year survival rate for patients at a dismal 8%. One of the significant barriers to effective treatment is the immunosuppressive pancreatic tumor microenvironment and development of resistance to treatment. New treatment options to increase both the survival and quality of life of patients are urgently needed. This study reports on a new non-cannabinoid, non-psychoactive derivative of cannabis, termed FBL-03G, with the potential to treat pancreatic cancer. In vitro results show major increase in apoptosis and consequential decrease in survival for two pancreatic cancer models- Panc-02 and KPC pancreatic cancer cells treated with varying concentrations of FBL-03G and radiotherapy. Meanwhile, in vivo results demonstrate therapeutic efficacy in delaying both local and metastatic tumor progression in animal models with pancreatic cancer when using FBL-03G sustainably delivered from smart radiotherapy biomaterials. Repeated experiments also showed significant (P < 0.0001) increase in survival for animals with pancreatic cancer compared to control cohorts. The findings demonstrate the potential for this new cannabis derivative in the treatment of both localized and advanced pancreatic cancer, providing impetus for further studies toward clinical translation.

Discussion highlights:

“From the results of this study, the key findings include, observation that a non-cannabinoid derivative of cannabis can enhance radiotherapy treatment outcomes in-vitro and in-vivo as highlighted in Figures 2, 4. Secondly, the sustained delivery of the cannabis derivative FBL-03G from smart radiotherapy biomaterials (SRBs) results in tumor growth inhibition of both locally treated and distant untreated tumors, with and without radiotherapy. The use of smart radiotherapy biomaterials (SRBs) (8, 23) was recently proposed as a novel approach to deliver cannabinoids, allowing for prolonged exposure of tumor cells to these cannabis derivatives, which is expected to be more effective (10). The FBL-03G payload used in this study is a flavonoid non- cannabinoid derivative of cannabis, and the potential to inhibit both local and metastatic tumor progression is remarkable, especially for pancreatic cancer, with a dismal 5-year survival rate of 8% (1).”

“While the results indicate that sustained exposure of tumor cells to FBL-03G can boost both local and metastatic tumor cell kill, the mechanism of such action needs to be further investigated. One hypothesis is that, FBL-03G can serve as an immunotherapy agent, inhibiting growth of locally treated and untreated tumors, representing metastasis. Metastasis accounts for most of all cancer-associated suffering and death, and questionably presents the most daunting challenge in cancer management. Henceforth, the observed significant increase in survival is promising, especially for pancreatic cancer which is often recalcitrant to treatments. Another hypothesis is that sustained delivery allows FBL-03G to reach the untreated tumor over a prolonged period as well. Either way, the FBL-03G results reveal a new potential non-cannabinoid cannabis derivative with major potential for consideration in further investigations in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, where new therapy options are urgently needed.”

Dr Caplan’s Take:

This article is one in a growing collection of impressive data that highlights a critical area of Medicine that has hidden from the scientific community for decades. The goal of the review is NOT to hail praise on cannabis as a panacea, nor even a sole treatment option, for pancreatic cancer. Rather, it highlights that it seems to be working effectively, both in living tumor cells in the lab and in animal models with live tumor cells. For a devastating illness that currently carries a grim prognosis, the proposition here is to learn more.

The milestones between pioneering scientific study and effective medication are many and there is much work to be done. Studies must be reviewed, criticized, replicated, integrated, before pioneering products can be developed, produced, tested, scaled, brought to market, marketed, sold, and consumed. The process is long, but at least there is a seed of hope at the beginning!

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2TPSY2t      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoid Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer?
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Flavonoids as Pain Relief

Forget CBD; flavonoids found in cannabis have been found to be 30 times more effective painkillers than aspirin, targeting inflammation at the source and making them great alternatives for pain killers. If produced on a larger scale, they could help get away from the opioid crisis.

http://bit.ly/2TbAxoG

Here, a folder w/ hundreds more specific reviews of the medical benefits of flavonoids: http://bit.ly/2XugfvI

Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoids as Pain Relief
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How to store cannabis

If stored properly, cannabis can last up to two years.
We are starting to see ground-breaking technology rising in the industry, including filtration of humidity built into packaging, as well as permeable membranes that support the wise guarding of both hydration and terpene/flavonoid concentration.

https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/how-long-is-my-cannabis-good-for-leaflys-guide-to-storing-cannabi

Benjamin Caplan, MDHow to store cannabis
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Do-it-Yourself Cannabis-infused lubricants

Cannabis-infused lubricant can increase blood flow for men and create full-body experiences for women. Find out how to make your own infused lube at home with this video tutorial!

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Benjamin Caplan, MDDo-it-Yourself Cannabis-infused lubricants
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Video: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures

One of the terrific realities of modern Cannabis is that it is possible, and often quite simple, to make effective products at home. With suitable education and access to testing facilities, the soil, nutrients, and plant growth can be supported at home, lab-tested for make-up and potency, as well as safety-checked for potential microscopic contaminants, and ultimately, individualized medicine can be created right at home!

Here is a sample instructional for just one way that cannabis tincture can be made at home. There are countless others and hopefully, many that are yet to be discovered!

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures
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Medicinal Value of Citrus Peels

Citrus peels waste as a source of value-added compounds: extraction and quantification of bioactive polyphenols

Previous analysis of citrus peels has demonstrated high content of biologically active polyphenols, with significant quantities of flavonoids and phenolic acids present. Both these compounds have been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, anti-allergic, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, neuroprotective, and antimicrobial properties.

A recent paper points out that citrus peel waste alone makes up nearly 50% of wet fruit mass discarded as waste and proposes extraction of polyphenols to minimize waste. The bioactive substances in peels can be used in dietary supplements, cosmetics, food products, and pharmaceutical products.

Citrus peels contain significant polyphenols, compounds which have health benefits ranging from antioxidant to anticancer. Polyphenols are also found in large quantities in cannabis, undoubtedly contributing to it many of its well-known health benefits. 

Image result for citrus peel eating

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2F8bPja     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMedicinal Value of Citrus Peels
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Flavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador

Chemical composition and Antioxidant Activity of the Main Fruits, Tubers and Legumes Traditionally Consumed in the Andean Regions of Ecuador as a Source of Health-Promoting Compounds

Many fruits grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador have been the center of medical and consumer interests due to their health benefits. Many plants from the region have been used, historically, as both food sources and therapeutic agents. In response to limited studies on the antioxidant capacity and bioactive compounds that make up these food sources, researchers analyzed many commonly consumed fruits, tubers, and legumes. These demonstrated high total flavonoid, phenolic, and anthocyanin content, which can contribute to high antioxidant potential. A range of antioxidant potentials exist, and many fruits possess these high antioxidant potentials.

Note: A high flavonoid content in many food sources grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador contributes to high antioxidant potential in many of these fruits, tubers, and legumes. Many plants, including cannabis, have high flavonoid content that gives them many viable therapeutic applications.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2YCwqDN     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador
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Between Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials

Characteristics of the bitter and sweet honey from Algeria Mediterranean coast

Previous research on honey and its historical use in traditional medicine has pointed toward its therapeutic application for the immune system, anemia, and heart function, among other conditions.

Two kinds of honey harvested from the Algeria Mediterranean coast, so-called poly-floral sweet honey and uni-floral bitter honey, have demonstrated their many medicinal uses. In a comparative analysis of the two kinds of honey, bitter honey had higher flavonoid content, lower sucrose content, and higher total polyphenols and tannins levels, giving it an increased antioxidant potential over sweet honey.

Additional Point: Factors including a higher flavonoid content in uni-floral bitter content gives it an improved antioxidant potential over poly-floral sweet honey. This makes for a wide variety of clinical benefits, including treatment of anemia, colon cancer, improved immune function, and more.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2FXPipE     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDBetween Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials
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Herbal Treatments may prove valuable to treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Promising Therapeutics with Natural Bioactive Compounds for Improving Learning and Memory — A Review of Randomized Trials  

A recent review has determined that herbal treatments, such as those including flavonoids, are beneficial when attempting to prevent neurocognitive decline, commonly seen in Alzheimer’s Disease. Galantamine, quercetin, examples of two flavonoids, as well as huperzine A, bacoside A, and ginkolide B, three flavonoid-like compounds, all proved to be effective when used as a treatment for poor memory function. The authors mention the need for similar results in clinical trials but find the current data compelling evidence for future drug development. 

Highlighted in this paper is the current perception of herbal products as natural, gentle, and safe in comparison to current synthetic drugs. While herbal products are generally safer and considered to be more gentle, it is important to note that for these herbal compounds to truly be effective when treating patients they likely need modification in order to optimize their benefits. The modification would increase potency, selectivity, and pharmacokinetic abilities, as well as lessen any possible side effects. Synthetic drugs may seem frightening, particularly in light of recent illnesses and mortality associated with their abuse, but technology can also be used to optimize novel drugs and it can be efficient to do so. 



View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2Xtu8u5    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDHerbal Treatments may prove valuable to treat Alzheimer’s Disease
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Study Reveals that Flavanoids can act as Allergy Medications

Anti-histaminic Effects of Resveratrol and Silymarin on Human Gingival Fibroblasts

It has recently been revealed that the flavonoids resveratrol and silymarin have an anti-histaminic effect on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). HGF are cells that compose part of the gum tissue in the oral cavity. Silymarin and resveratrol were already known to have anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, but a recently published study has now revealed that silymarin alone and a combination of the two flavonoids both provide novel therapeutic approaches for inflammation due to allergies.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Ff1lhW   inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDStudy Reveals that Flavanoids can act as Allergy Medications
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