Law

Incidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations

Title: A review of drug abuse in recently reported cases of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) in Asia, USA, and Europe

A recent literature review has found that the current driving regulations in Asia, Europe, and the US have not prevented cases of driving under the influence of drugs. The authors observed steady trends of incidences of driving under the influence in all three regions, despite legislature specifically enacted against such actions. In the literature, there is a consistent recommendation that drivers should be regularly tested, especially in the case of an accident, in order to gather more data on the role of drugs in traffic accidents. 


This review highlights the different illicit drugs that contribute to traffic accidents, depending on the region of the world. Cannabis is legal in certain areas of Europe, whereas it is still considered an illicit substance here in the US, and many other locations, worldwide. Looking at the differences in severity or circumstance of the accidents between the type of illicit drug used may provide data to create more beneficial regulations for each country. As the legal status of cannabis continues to evolve, and it becomes more common to find drivers on the road who have consumed a minimal amount of cannabis, new screening techniques will likely be developed to help the culture establish what it considers an “acceptable amount” of blood-borne cannabinoids to be.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2JucMot     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDIncidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations
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In MA, despite being state-legal, FDA says CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. What now?

MA effectively outlawed the sale of any food products with CBD or products which make therapeutic claims. This is the result of FDA saying that CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. In a state where cannabis is legally accessible, consumers and hemp farmers are very unhappy. What do you think? http://bit.ly/2IOtTRm

Benjamin Caplan, MDIn MA, despite being state-legal, FDA says CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. What now?
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Cannabis Cafes coming to MA

Massachusetts has come one step closer to a pilot program involving cannabis cafes across the state. This will also bring about more licenses for cannabis delivery and social consumption, as a less capital-intensive option for entrepreneurs to enter the industry. http://bit.ly/2IOjOUz

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis Cafes coming to MA
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Case Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws

Crossing the Line: Care of a Pediatric Patient with Intractable Seizures and Severe Neuropathic Pain in Absence of Access to Medical Marijuana

A recent case report discussing a six-year-old patient suffering from a seizure disorder has exposed the difficulty is receiving treatment across state lines. The patient was prescribed medical marijuana that alleviated the severity and duration of her seizures but was weaned off that medication when traveling to Nebraska for a therapeutic surgery due to the legal status in the state. This case study exposes the difficulty of treating patients across the country due to the legal variability of cannabis across states.  

An interesting question brought up in this case study is how to handle palliative care in the absence of opioids and without synthetic products. A combination of massage, essential oils, and salt light therapies were able to compensate for medical marijuana, but not without great effort. Natural therapies like the ones administered here are costly and highlight the simplicity and effectiveness of medicinal cannabis.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2IxPoWN      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCase Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws
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US House of Representatives votes to support state legal cannabis

Kudos to Kyle Jaeger for a helpful summary of last week’s US House’s vote on an amendment to block the Department of Justice from interfering in states’ legal cannabis programs. His work outlines which representatives stand where, with regard to #cannabis. Interesting to see, and how times change! http://bit.ly/2LgKO0P

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Benjamin Caplan, MDUS House of Representatives votes to support state legal cannabis
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Oregon aiming to supply Cannabis nationally

In what may be considered preemptive action, Oregon legislature passed Senate Bill 582, allowing the governor to enter agreements with other states for cannabis import and export. This hinges on the federal government, but if so, Oregon aims to be a national supplier of cannabis. https://lat.ms/2LezJ00

Benjamin Caplan, MDOregon aiming to supply Cannabis nationally
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Massachusetts patients Initial Access option

Exciting note to Massachusetts medical cannabis patients: Beginning July 1, medical patients will have the opportunity for an “Initial Access Certification” once they have seen their certifying physician.
This access is good for 14 days, so patients will no longer have to wait for the state approval process before having access to medication.
More info: http://bit.ly/2LmFY1Q

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMassachusetts patients Initial Access option
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Characteristics of Canadians likely to try or increase cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes

In October 2018, recreational cannabis became legal in Canada. And in 2019, researchers asked nearly 20 thousand Canadians over the age of 15 about their cannabis habits. The survey found that 1 in 5 Canadians plan on trying or increasing cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes, particularly those who are younger, who have used cannabis in the past 3 months, and who have a higher income. To ensure responsible cannabis use and informed decision-making, clinicians and policy-makers should pay close attention to these higher risk populations.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2Lfduay      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCharacteristics of Canadians likely to try or increase cannabis use following legalization for non-medical purposes
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Home Grows vs Big Marijuana vs Governmental Oversight

In light of recent changes and discussion in NY and IL cannabis laws, the right to grow at home has been highly debated. Legislation and “big marijuana” are concerned with black market control, lab testing, and lost tax revenue; many of these concerns are blown out of proportion http://bit.ly/2WSbsUK

Benjamin Caplan, MDHome Grows vs Big Marijuana vs Governmental Oversight
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