Non-Cannabis Plant

Atriplex Tatarica Flavonoids Show Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity

 Investigation into the flavonoid derivatives of Atriplex tatarica shows that it provides anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

P. aeruginosa is a bacterium that causes infections most frequently in immunocompromised individuals who have been hospitalized for long periods of time. A biofilm is a protective shield that some types of bacteria create for themselves in attempt to protect against host immune system defenses. An infection that evades an immune system can become quickly dangerous should bacterial or biofilm grow in the lungs, kidney, or urinary tracts. Incorporating the flavonoids found in A. tatarica into medical regimen could provide an option for augmenting current treatment for antibiotic-resistant infections. The growth of biofilms, or collections of microorganisms that can grow on a wide variety of surfaces, makes the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitalized patients with antibiotics markedly more difficult. Certain flavonoids with proven anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm provide an alternative route for helping to manage deadly antibiotic-resistant infections.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAtriplex Tatarica Flavonoids Show Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity
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Brazilian Medicinal Plant Shows Important Anti-inflammatory Action

Anti-inflammatory activity of Protium spruceanum is associated to immunomodulation and enzymes inhibition

In Summary:

Protium spruceanum, a plant often used in traditional Brazilian medicine, can reduce inflammation. Investigation into the molecular action of the plant shows that treatment using both leaves and branches can result in the inhibition of ROS, NO, NAG, MMP-9, COX-2, and iNOS, all normal mediators of inflammation. Protium spruceanum is one of many plants containing high phenol/flavonoid, terpenoid, and glycoside content that exhibits notable anti-inflammatory properties.

Related image Protium spruceanum with anti-inflammatory activity

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Benjamin Caplan, MDBrazilian Medicinal Plant Shows Important Anti-inflammatory Action
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Anti-Cancer and DNA Protective Capabilities of a Non-Cannabis Plant

Investigation of chemical profile, biological properties of Lotus corniculatus extracts and their apoptotic-autophagic effects on breast cancer cells

In Summary:

A study of Lotus corniculatus demonstrated that extracts of the plant possess antioxidant, DNA protective, wound healing, and anti-cancer properties. L. corniculatus, known colloquially as bird’s foot trefoil, is a plant commonly used during off-season to manage erosion and prepare feed for livestock. The plant has been used for medicinal purposed to treat IBS and insomnia. Researchers prepared extracts of the plant in water, ethyl acetate and methanol to compare differences between the three solvents. Water extracts exhibited the most significant antioxidative and protective DNA properties, while both ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts induced death in and prevented the migration and proliferation of breast cancer cells.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAnti-Cancer and DNA Protective Capabilities of a Non-Cannabis Plant
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Wound-Healing Activity and Phytochemical Screening of Purified Fractions of Crassulaceae Leaves on HCT 116 Cells

A Common Succulent Provides Wound Healing Benefits

In Summary

A recent study has found that Sempervivum tectorum L. (Crassulaceae), a common succulent, has wound healing properties. During testing, it was demonstrated that an extract of the succulent, known to be rich in flavonoids, enhanced cellular proliferation and migration, proving its therapeutic benefit. The authors have suggested that a topical treatment made from the extract would be an efficient delivery method.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDWound-Healing Activity and Phytochemical Screening of Purified Fractions of Crassulaceae Leaves on HCT 116 Cells
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A Flavonol from Sweetscented Marigold Alleviates Pain

Tagetes Lucida as a potential analgesic

In Summary:

Researchers have recently provided evidence that a flavonol extract derived from a common flower has antinociceptive (pain-relieving) properties. Sweet-scented Marigold has been used is frequently used in cooking techniques in South America and has now been found to alleviate pain through serotonin and opioid mechanisms of action. The antinociceptive properties of this flavonol, like those of many other plant-derived compounds, are ripe for testing in a clinical setting to determine their effectiveness in human patients. In this small animal study, it clearly demonstrates promise as a safe alternative to commonly used pain medications. 

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

Modern medicine seems to have largely forgotten its roots. Long before pharmaceutical companies were the source of all medication, the earth served as a resource for medications, and apothecaries, pharmacists, and druggists, as they were known, supported the medical industry with formulations and a deep understanding of natural resources. As the greater scientific arena and dominant culture have lost touch with the earth’s natural medicinal resources, our culture has lost a deeply valuable reservoir of opportunity. As the fast-paced life of modernity demands faster results on an ever-greater, mass-production scale, the construction of sprawling cities, which often demands deforestation and destruction of natural resources, may turn out to be a greater threat to human health than most of us have yet to even understand.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDA Flavonol from Sweetscented Marigold Alleviates Pain
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Medicinal Value of Citrus Peels

Citrus peels waste as a source of value-added compounds: extraction and quantification of bioactive polyphenols

Previous analysis of citrus peels has demonstrated high content of biologically active polyphenols, with significant quantities of flavonoids and phenolic acids present. Both these compounds have been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, anti-allergic, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, neuroprotective, and antimicrobial properties.

A recent paper points out that citrus peel waste alone makes up nearly 50% of wet fruit mass discarded as waste and proposes extraction of polyphenols to minimize waste. The bioactive substances in peels can be used in dietary supplements, cosmetics, food products, and pharmaceutical products.

Citrus peels contain significant polyphenols, compounds which have health benefits ranging from antioxidant to anticancer. Polyphenols are also found in large quantities in cannabis, undoubtedly contributing to it many of its well-known health benefits. 

Image result for citrus peel eating

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMedicinal Value of Citrus Peels
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Flavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador

Chemical composition and Antioxidant Activity of the Main Fruits, Tubers and Legumes Traditionally Consumed in the Andean Regions of Ecuador as a Source of Health-Promoting Compounds

Many fruits grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador have been the center of medical and consumer interests due to their health benefits. Many plants from the region have been used, historically, as both food sources and therapeutic agents. In response to limited studies on the antioxidant capacity and bioactive compounds that make up these food sources, researchers analyzed many commonly consumed fruits, tubers, and legumes. These demonstrated high total flavonoid, phenolic, and anthocyanin content, which can contribute to high antioxidant potential. A range of antioxidant potentials exist, and many fruits possess these high antioxidant potentials.

Note: A high flavonoid content in many food sources grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador contributes to high antioxidant potential in many of these fruits, tubers, and legumes. Many plants, including cannabis, have high flavonoid content that gives them many viable therapeutic applications.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador
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Between Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials

Characteristics of the bitter and sweet honey from Algeria Mediterranean coast

Previous research on honey and its historical use in traditional medicine has pointed toward its therapeutic application for the immune system, anemia, and heart function, among other conditions.

Two kinds of honey harvested from the Algeria Mediterranean coast, so-called poly-floral sweet honey and uni-floral bitter honey, have demonstrated their many medicinal uses. In a comparative analysis of the two kinds of honey, bitter honey had higher flavonoid content, lower sucrose content, and higher total polyphenols and tannins levels, giving it an increased antioxidant potential over sweet honey.

Additional Point: Factors including a higher flavonoid content in uni-floral bitter content gives it an improved antioxidant potential over poly-floral sweet honey. This makes for a wide variety of clinical benefits, including treatment of anemia, colon cancer, improved immune function, and more.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDBetween Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials
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Study Reveals that Flavanoids can act as Allergy Medications

Anti-histaminic Effects of Resveratrol and Silymarin on Human Gingival Fibroblasts

It has recently been revealed that the flavonoids resveratrol and silymarin have an anti-histaminic effect on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). HGF are cells that compose part of the gum tissue in the oral cavity. Silymarin and resveratrol were already known to have anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, but a recently published study has now revealed that silymarin alone and a combination of the two flavonoids both provide novel therapeutic approaches for inflammation due to allergies.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDStudy Reveals that Flavanoids can act as Allergy Medications
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Complex Genetics Underlie Cannabinoid Production

Cannabinoid Inheritance Relies on Complex Genetic Architecture

Researchers have recently attempted to discover the genetic basis of cannabinoid production within cannabis plants, finding a complex genetic architecture. This study highlights the lack of knowledge surrounding cannabis cultivation, suggesting current producers record the phenotypic and genetic crosses they breed so that the community can further research the cannabinoids produced. Specifying which genetic profiles match up to the ratio of cannabinoids produced will benefit mass production and medical research.

The introduction of this article focuses heavily on the ratio of ∆-9-tetrahydrocannabinol to cannabidiol, yet there are therapeutic benefits associated with all of the other cannabinoids as well as flavonoids and terpenes produced by the plant. Multiple chemical components of cannabis strains have yet to be fully explored and preliminary findings warrant the same amount of attention in order to develop various therapies.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDComplex Genetics Underlie Cannabinoid Production
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