Regulation

Pediatric Oncology Center Justifies the Use of Medical Cannabis

Pediatric oncologists from Minnesota recently published an article justifying their use of medical cannabis as palliative care for their patients.

The majority of patients at the oncology center were approved for medical cannabis use during their first round of treatment, in order to immediately address the negative side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, pain, and cancer cachexia. The data provided from the center described much higher chemotherapy compliance rates among patients, and that patients have a much better quality of life when utilizing cannabis.

This article highlights a few promising trends and issues with using medical cannabis; one promising trend is the hope for cannabis to provide antitumor effects. Cannabis has been a subject of exploration for antitumor effects and it has shown promising results. But, there are many limitations to the few studies that have been published, leading the authors to defer any definitive conclusions. The center in Minnesota noted that many of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors were especially hopeful that cannabis would aid in curing them of cancer, second to utilizing the drug for nausea. This is a promising trend because it means the greater public is showing interest in the therapeutic possibilities of cannabis and their support and call for research will aid the drive for the federal rescheduling of marijuana. 

Also highlighted in this article is that, of all the patients certified to use medical cannabis, a subset of 24% never actually registered through the state to receive it. The authors have no firm explanation for these circumstances but seem to suspect that the $200 annual certification fee, on top of the cost for each additional dispensed product may be limiting of patients abilities to afford cannabis. Without the backing of the federal government, insurance companies are unable to cover medical cannabis. As the depth and reach of cannabis research grow, there are good reasons for patients to feel optimistic about medical cannabis.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Xb2O3N     inside the CED Foundation Archive


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Benjamin Caplan, MDPediatric Oncology Center Justifies the Use of Medical Cannabis
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Adolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%

Characteristics of Daily E-Cigarette Use and Acquisition Means Among a National Sample of Adolescents

From 2017 to 2018 the amount of middle school and high school electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users increased by 48% and 78% respectively. One of the first studies examining the association between e-cigarette characteristics and daily use among US adolescents is calling for comprehensive tobacco control efforts to reduce e-cigarette and nicotine addiction among adolescents. 38% of adolescent users report using their e-cigarette devices for cannabis which can be hazardous due to the lack of regulation. The potential risks associated with nicotine use and the dangerous misuse of these devices for other substances is putting youth’s health at risk.

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This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2Ff733m     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAdolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%
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Regulation of hemp in Tennessee

Tennessee is yet another state looking to regulate hemp effectively, and a proposed solution to this is on-the-go testing kits to determine THC levels in hemp products. If executed well, this could prevent many from being charged with possession of cannabis and save money in the courts and prison systems http://bit.ly/2ISjm7V

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Benjamin Caplan, MDRegulation of hemp in Tennessee
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Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

Title of study: Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

After legalization in 2018, many Canadian provinces implemented “zero tolerance” policies for drivers who have THC in their systems. But a new study from the University of British Columbia suggests that Canada’s drug-impaired driving laws may be unnecessarily strict. According to researchers, there is no link between THC levels below 5ng/mL and increased risk of car accidents.

Note: Considering the potentially grave risk to life and health for modern culture to make the wrong interpretation of the potential dangers of the effects of cannabis consumption on driving, it is critical for the industry to approach the circumstances with delicacy and diligence. Ideally, everyone involved will be motivated to learn as much as possible about the impact of cannabis on the risks of operating machinery and all will follow a cautious approach which will minimize the risk to all. To that end, it is important to consider and reconcile evidence from multiple perspectives.

The article:

“New study suggests low levels of THC in blood do not increase risk of car crash” https://www.straight.com/cannabis/1256476/new-study-suggests-low-levels-thc-blood-do-not-increase-risk-car-crash#

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2IVhSJY    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study
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The Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain

A Budding Source of Targets for Treating Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain ECS

The cannabinoid system provides momentum to develop cannabinoid-based medications to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain as researchers continue to find promising therapeutic targets. These new targets may lead to the formation of novel pain-relief medications that may serve well to alleviate pain for those suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, and fibromyalgia. Cannabis-based pain medicine is also being researched for opioid-sparing effects and effectiveness in reducing the necessary dose of opioids.

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This paper is also stored here:  http://bit.ly/2FfLorA        inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Cannabinoid System is a Promising Source of Targets for Treating Pain
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Medical vs Rec

Many think medical marijuana laws will ultimately lead to adult-use, but this is not necessarily true, and for good reason. The medical industry recognizes that cannabis is a powerful medication and prioritizes its safety and health benefits, while so-called “recreational” or “adult use” cannabis seems to focus more on making money and supporting the pleasurable aspects of the plant.

Interestingly, at CED Clinic, we’re seeing more and more patients come in from the “adult-use.” Whether it’s a desire for comprehensive education (anything we put into our bodies has effects), personalizing a medical plan that considers short-term and long-term impact, or simply having a knowledgeable person to support individual choices and empowerment on an individual journey, we find that our patients enjoy learning and riding the cutting edge of the science of cannabis! http://bit.ly/2INDGY7

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMedical vs Rec
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In MA, despite being state-legal, FDA says CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. What now?

MA effectively outlawed the sale of any food products with CBD or products which make therapeutic claims. This is the result of FDA saying that CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. In a state where cannabis is legally accessible, consumers and hemp farmers are very unhappy. What do you think? http://bit.ly/2IOtTRm

Benjamin Caplan, MDIn MA, despite being state-legal, FDA says CBD cannot be added to food or dietary supplements. What now?
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Cannabis Cafes coming to MA

Massachusetts has come one step closer to a pilot program involving cannabis cafes across the state. This will also bring about more licenses for cannabis delivery and social consumption, as a less capital-intensive option for entrepreneurs to enter the industry. http://bit.ly/2IOjOUz

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis Cafes coming to MA
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