Science

Standardized Registries may Improve Our Knowledge about Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

Title: Cyclic vomiting syndrome- Pathophysiology, comorbidities, and future research directions

A recent article has called for the establishment of a multicenter registry in order to learn more about cyclic vomiting syndrome and related disorders. Creating such a registry would provide a database of patients for clinical trial recruitment, research on patient outcomes across different treatment methods, the underlying mechanism for the disorder, and the ability to identify potential biomarkers for the disorder. The registry would expand our understanding of the disorder, on all fronts, and hopefully, reveal the most effective treatment method. 


Could such a registry be created while still safeguarding patient privacy?


Highlighted in this article is the similarity of cyclic vomiting syndrome and cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS). CHS is often misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed for an exorbitant amount of time. By creating this registry for cyclic vomiting syndrome and related disorders, including CHS, the same information about genetics, underlying mechanisms, and effective treatments could also be determined.

Finding a genetic basis for cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome would support patients looking into cannabis-based medicine to decide if cannabis would even be an effective treatment, by allowing them to discover possible side effects to which they might be more susceptible.

View this review (yellow link) or download:


This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2JtDAFm    inside the CED Foundation Archive


See the full available literature on Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome here: http://bit.ly/2XHfdrI


To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDStandardized Registries may Improve Our Knowledge about Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome
read more

False Memory Formation Does not Differ between Cannabis Users and Controls

Title: False memory formation in cannabis users- a field study

This new study has revealed that although cannabis use does not increase the rate of false memory acquisition, cannabis use did increase the uncertainty of participants. It was also determined that intoxicated cannabis users were less accurate when recognizing true events, providing evidence that cannabis intoxication hinders memory formation.

This research provides a basis of knowledge for those interviewing people under the influence of cannabis for legal proceedings to determine the validity of their statements. If cannabis intoxication increases the uncertainty and liberal answers provided by users then their statements should be used sparingly or well-corroborated. 


This research highlights the importance of understanding cannabis for legal proceedings. More and more state governments are legalizing medical and recreational cannabis, each year, increasing the amount of those eligible to legally consume cannabis. As cannabis use continues to climb in popularity, witnesses or others interviewed in legal settings may not provide the most accurate information. Acute cannabis use should be a consideration related to legal proceedings so that the users’ statements can be weighed appropriately.  

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2Jt6eWY    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDFalse Memory Formation Does not Differ between Cannabis Users and Controls
read more

The Endocannabinoid System May Play a Role in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Title: CB1 receptor antagonism in capuchin monkeys alters social interaction and aversive memory extinction

A recent study has revealed that the dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system may play a role in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Using non-human primates, researchers were able to mimic some of the social impairment seen in autism models by antagonizing cannabinoid 1 receptors with synthetic cannabinoids. Future research may continue to show links between ASD and the endocannabinoid system, suggesting that cannabinoids may be used to treat the social impairments characteristic in ASD. 


This research highlights how the endocannabinoid system may provide novel targets for developing therapies for what have seemed, previously, to be treatment-resistant disorders. Autism is still not well-understood and has many false beliefs associated with it. By studying the possible role of the endocannabinoid systems in ASD, researchers may be able to shed light on the mechanism(s) underlining the disorders and develop targeted treatments that allow patients a degree of greater control over the symptoms.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2Ju4dds    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Endocannabinoid System May Play a Role in Autism Spectrum Disorders
read more

Medicinal Value of Citrus Peels

Citrus peels waste as a source of value-added compounds: extraction and quantification of bioactive polyphenols

Previous analysis of citrus peels has demonstrated high content of biologically active polyphenols, with significant quantities of flavonoids and phenolic acids present. Both these compounds have been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, anti-allergic, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, neuroprotective, and antimicrobial properties.

A recent paper points out that citrus peel waste alone makes up nearly 50% of wet fruit mass discarded as waste and proposes extraction of polyphenols to minimize waste. The bioactive substances in peels can be used in dietary supplements, cosmetics, food products, and pharmaceutical products.

Citrus peels contain significant polyphenols, compounds which have health benefits ranging from antioxidant to anticancer. Polyphenols are also found in large quantities in cannabis, undoubtedly contributing to it many of its well-known health benefits. 

Image result for citrus peel eating

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2F8bPja     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDMedicinal Value of Citrus Peels
read more

Video: Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review

This literature review summarizes the findings on the role of cannabis in treating autoimmune diseases. Cannabis has anti-inflammatory properties when treating rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, type 1 diabetes, IBD, neuropathic pain, and fibromyalgia. Below is a video adaptation of “Cannabinoids in Rheumatoid Arthritis.” 

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:  http://bit.ly/2Y1paV5       inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review
read more

Flavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador

Chemical composition and Antioxidant Activity of the Main Fruits, Tubers and Legumes Traditionally Consumed in the Andean Regions of Ecuador as a Source of Health-Promoting Compounds

Many fruits grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador have been the center of medical and consumer interests due to their health benefits. Many plants from the region have been used, historically, as both food sources and therapeutic agents. In response to limited studies on the antioxidant capacity and bioactive compounds that make up these food sources, researchers analyzed many commonly consumed fruits, tubers, and legumes. These demonstrated high total flavonoid, phenolic, and anthocyanin content, which can contribute to high antioxidant potential. A range of antioxidant potentials exist, and many fruits possess these high antioxidant potentials.

Note: A high flavonoid content in many food sources grown in the Andean regions of Ecuador contributes to high antioxidant potential in many of these fruits, tubers, and legumes. Many plants, including cannabis, have high flavonoid content that gives them many viable therapeutic applications.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2YCwqDN     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoid Content and Antioxidant Potential of Fruits, Tubers, and Legumes in the Andean Regions of Ecuador
read more

Between Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials

Characteristics of the bitter and sweet honey from Algeria Mediterranean coast

Previous research on honey and its historical use in traditional medicine has pointed toward its therapeutic application for the immune system, anemia, and heart function, among other conditions.

Two kinds of honey harvested from the Algeria Mediterranean coast, so-called poly-floral sweet honey and uni-floral bitter honey, have demonstrated their many medicinal uses. In a comparative analysis of the two kinds of honey, bitter honey had higher flavonoid content, lower sucrose content, and higher total polyphenols and tannins levels, giving it an increased antioxidant potential over sweet honey.

Additional Point: Factors including a higher flavonoid content in uni-floral bitter content gives it an improved antioxidant potential over poly-floral sweet honey. This makes for a wide variety of clinical benefits, including treatment of anemia, colon cancer, improved immune function, and more.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2FXPipE     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:


Benjamin Caplan, MDBetween Bitter and Sweet Honey, from Algeria Mediterranean Coast, Different Flavonoid Content Contributes to Distinct Antioxidant Potentials
read more

In Vivo Availability of Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Levels in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis

A 2019 study found that patients with early-stage psychotic disorders had lower levels of CB1-R (Cannabinoid Receptor – 1) compared to healthy individuals. These findings suggest that targeting CB1R with cannabis-based products could potentially treat psychotic disorders. Interestingly, reductions in CB1R levels were associated with greater symptom severity and poorer cognitive functioning but only in male patients. More research is needed into the intersections of gender and psychotic disorders.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2XEkpfV      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDIn Vivo Availability of Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Levels in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis
read more

More Research Needed to Determine Impacts of Cannabis Use During Pregnancy

Cannabis Use in Pregnancy

With rates of cannabis use during pregnancy more than doubling between 2002 and 2017, a need for more studies, over longer periods of time, which investigate prenatal cannabis use has emerged. Existing data ranges from reporting an increased risk for preterm birth and low birth weight to cannabis reducing the risk of preeclampsia and gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Concerns are historically informed by preliminary alcohol and cocaine studies that falsely suggested no gestational harm, despite the eventual recognition that these substances ultimately carry significant risk. Pregnant women should exercise caution in their cannabis use until more definitive conclusions are found, regarding maternal cannabis use.

The decision of where, if anywhere, cannabis fits in relationship to pregnancy is populated with more questions than answers. There are a handful of good quality, long-term studies, to date, that show a pattern that informs some degree of generalization: by and large, the less frequently consumed, and the later during the pregnancy the consumption, the less potential risk. But, for the sake of any pregnant woman and her baby, this type of decision should always be made in direct consultation with the obstetrician supporting the pregnancy.

Additional Point: A lack of high-quality studies relating to cannabis use and gestational risk has resulted in conflicting evidence surrounding prenatal cannabis use. However, historical context involving prenatal alcohol and cocaine use studies informs the need to exercise caution before definitive conclusions are made

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2FUQXfp    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDMore Research Needed to Determine Impacts of Cannabis Use During Pregnancy
read more

Supplementing Antipsychotics with CBD Enhances Psychotic Symptom Treatment

Cannabidiol (CBD) as an Adjunctive Therapy in Schizophrenia: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

Most schizophrenia medications function by blocking the action of the dopamine D2 receptor and effectively treat positive psychotic symptoms, such as delusions or hallucinations, but fail to treat negative psychotic symptoms, such as lack of motivation or the lack of an ability to feel pleasure. Anecdotal evidence has pointed toward the potential for CBD to attenuate psychotic symptoms in conjunction with normally prescribed antipsychotics; additionally, CBD is not hypothesized to act on the D2 receptor, suggesting that it may afford unique advantages over anti-psychotics.

Researchers interested in further exploring this conducted the first known placebo-controlled CBD trial among schizophrenia patients. Although results did not suggest a potential for CBD to treat negative psychotic symptoms, in conjunction with antipsychotics, the CBD group experienced marked lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms. Both the placebo and CBD groups experienced equal levels of treatment-induced adverse events, suggesting that CBD is well-tolerated.

These results suggest that CBD may be effective in treating not only schizophrenia but also psychotic symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease and THC-induced psychosis.

Additional Point: CBD has shown to act in a neuroprotective manner and reduce the psychoactive effects of THC, making it a viable option for patients who have experienced negative side effects with THC.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2WztI04     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDSupplementing Antipsychotics with CBD Enhances Psychotic Symptom Treatment
read more