Seizure / Epilepsy

A Cannabinoid-Like Compound Modulates Neuronal Excitability, May Reduce Seizures

The Cannabinoid-Like Compound, VSN16R, Acts on Large Conductance, Ca2 -Activated K  Channels to Modulate Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Firing

In Summary

Researchers have recently found a cannabinoid-like compound, VSN16R, which is able to modulate Ca2+– activated potassium channels and may reduce seizure severity. By hyperpolarizing the neurons through the opening of Ca2+– activated potassium channels VSN16R ultimately results in the reduction of hyperexcitability seen in individuals who suffer from seizures. The compiled data reveals that cannabinoids or compounds structurally similar to cannabinoids may prove useful in the treatment of seizures or epileptic disorders, similar to the cannabinol-based Epidiolex® medication for rare forms of epilepsy, reducing the chance of a seizure or minimizing its duration. Further research is needed to aid the development of more readily available cannabis-based therapies for seizure activity and more general forms of epilepsy. 

Highlighting in this article are the options for treatment that the endocannabinoid system provides us, even in the absence of naturally occurring cannabinoids. If structurally similar compounds like VSN16R are able to be synthesized and proven effective, it could mean novel therapies could be developed even while red tape surrounds cannabis. The endocannabinoid system affects a myriad of systems within the human body and is severely under-researched considering its potential. Epidiolex® is the only cannabinoid-based medication currently approved by the federal government but cannabis has shown promise in so many other areas where the current treatment is either ineffective or lacking. Research utilizing the endocannabinoid system as a target should continue and be pushed to the forefront of the medical community.

The study is available for review or download here

View more studies like this in the CED Foundation Archive 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDA Cannabinoid-Like Compound Modulates Neuronal Excitability, May Reduce Seizures
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Long-Term Administration of CBD has No Effect on Cognitive Function

Cognitive functioning following long-term cannabidiol use in adults with treatment-resistant epilepsy

In Summary

A recent study has revealed that the cognitive function of adults taking cannabidiol (CBD) to treat their treatment-resistant epilepsy (TRE) was not affected by long-term use. Analysis of the study revealed no correlation between cognitive change scores and CBD dose, nor was there a correlation between change in seizure severity and cognitive test performance. Cognitive dysfunction commonly occurs comorbidly to TRE so it is important to note CBD has yet to show the ability to repair cognitive function but it will not further hinder cognitive function. 

This post highlights the limitations of research for cannabis despite CBD being approved by the FDA to treat rare forms of epilepsy. This is because of a lack of a control group, which would be provided by adults not suffering from TRE but consuming the same dose of CBD or by adults suffering from TRE but not taking medication. If cannabis, or even just CBD, were supported for medical use at the federal level researchers would be able to create much more efficacious treatments within a more rapid time-frame. 

The study is available for review or download here:

View more studies like this in the CED Foundation Archive 


To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDLong-Term Administration of CBD has No Effect on Cognitive Function
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Case Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws

Crossing the Line: Care of a Pediatric Patient with Intractable Seizures and Severe Neuropathic Pain in Absence of Access to Medical Marijuana

A recent case report discussing a six-year-old patient suffering from a seizure disorder has exposed the difficulty is receiving treatment across state lines. The patient was prescribed medical marijuana that alleviated the severity and duration of her seizures but was weaned off of that medication when traveling to Nebraska for a therapeutic surgery, due to the legal status in the state. This case study exposes the difficulty of treating patients across the country due to the legal variability of cannabis across states.  

Author’s summary reflections:

“The current state-specific approach to medical marijuana notably burdens patients, families, and health care systems with a fragmented approach to symptom management based on local context. The stigmatization or legal implications of medical marijuana in certain settings may lead well-meaning providers to avoid asking about use or to struggle with appropriate response. Provider response to parents reporting medical marijuana use in Schedule I settings notably varies from direct inquiry, feigned ignorance, or informed ignoring. Ideally, providers would compassionately and competently inquire about pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical interventions (to include medical marijuana use) as part of comprehensive palliative care symptom assessments.”

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2IxPoWN    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCase Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws
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Video: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures

One of the terrific realities of modern Cannabis is that it is possible, and often quite simple, to make effective products at home. With suitable education and access to testing facilities, the soil, nutrients, and plant growth can be supported at home, lab-tested for make-up and potency, as well as safety-checked for potential microscopic contaminants, and ultimately, individualized medicine can be created right at home!

Here is a sample instructional for just one way that cannabis tincture can be made at home. There are countless others and hopefully, many that are yet to be discovered!

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures
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Case Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws

Crossing the Line: Care of a Pediatric Patient with Intractable Seizures and Severe Neuropathic Pain in Absence of Access to Medical Marijuana

A recent case report discussing a six-year-old patient suffering from a seizure disorder has exposed the difficulty is receiving treatment across state lines. The patient was prescribed medical marijuana that alleviated the severity and duration of her seizures but was weaned off that medication when traveling to Nebraska for a therapeutic surgery due to the legal status in the state. This case study exposes the difficulty of treating patients across the country due to the legal variability of cannabis across states.  

An interesting question brought up in this case study is how to handle palliative care in the absence of opioids and without synthetic products. A combination of massage, essential oils, and salt light therapies were able to compensate for medical marijuana, but not without great effort. Natural therapies like the ones administered here are costly and highlight the simplicity and effectiveness of medicinal cannabis.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2IxPoWN      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCase Studies Reveal Difficulties in Differences between State Cannabis Laws
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Cost-effectiveness of treating pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy

Cannabis-based treatments may reduce seizures among children with drug-resistant epilepsy, but are these treatments cost-effective? 

Economic evaluations of cannabis treatments are needed, and they should address issues including weight-gain over time, switching or discontinuation of treatments, the effectiveness of interventions, and long-term success, beyond the duration of available clinical studies.

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2INWAOJ    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDCost-effectiveness of treating pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy
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