Social Justice

Medical cannabis doctors left to handle “backlash” from patients over lack of availability

Though UK doctors have been able to prescribe cannabis since November 2018, very few prescriptions have been issued, because most forms of medical cannabis have not been approved by the government.

In response to thousands of disappointed patients, the House of Commons Health and Social Care Committee called for immediate clinical trials focusing on the treatment of intractable childhood epilepsy. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDMedical cannabis doctors left to handle “backlash” from patients over lack of availability
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Massachusetts enshrines education requirements into the cannabis standard of care

Kudos to the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission for implementing a regulatory standard to ensure a sustained opportunity for education and knowledge improvement into the state’s cannabis industry and community.

Massachusetts has consistently shown outstanding leadership in the healthcare arena, and it’s thrilling to see that cannabis is treated no differently.

Already leading the cutting edge of research, education, and cannabis formulation development, CED Foundation is ready & eager to support our industry colleagues with education and guidance, here in MA, and worldwide.

Benjamin Caplan, MDMassachusetts enshrines education requirements into the cannabis standard of care
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Incidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations

Title: A review of drug abuse in recently reported cases of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) in Asia, USA, and Europe

A recent literature review has found that the current driving regulations in Asia, Europe, and the US have not prevented cases of driving under the influence of drugs. The authors observed steady trends of incidences of driving under the influence in all three regions, despite legislature specifically enacted against such actions. In the literature, there is a consistent recommendation that drivers should be regularly tested, especially in the case of an accident, in order to gather more data on the role of drugs in traffic accidents. 


This review highlights the different illicit drugs that contribute to traffic accidents, depending on the region of the world. Cannabis is legal in certain areas of Europe, whereas it is still considered an illicit substance here in the US, and many other locations, worldwide. Looking at the differences in severity or circumstance of the accidents between the type of illicit drug used may provide data to create more beneficial regulations for each country. As the legal status of cannabis continues to evolve, and it becomes more common to find drivers on the road who have consumed a minimal amount of cannabis, new screening techniques will likely be developed to help the culture establish what it considers an “acceptable amount” of blood-borne cannabinoids to be.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDIncidents of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Reveals A Need for Stricter Regulations
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Video: Medical Cannabis Around the Globe & Across Centuries

Throughout the ages, from health & wellness, religious rituals, and textile applications to the entertainment and social elements, cannabis has been a vital part of multiple sectors of human culture.

For millions, the modern cannabis revival is a welcome return home to a core element that has been missing for years.

 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Medical Cannabis Around the Globe & Across Centuries
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Stress Increases the Probability of Drug Abuse

The Effects of Trait Emotional Intelligence on Adolescent Substance Use- Findings From a Hungarian Representative Survey

A recent study has revealed that teenagers who have a difficult time managing stress and appear to lack empathy were more likely to abuse tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis.

The studies initial goal was to determine if emotional intelligence could predict future drug abuse, but found that those with more empathy and interpersonal competencies were less likely to engage in substance abuse. This study provides data that may help to develop targeted drug prevention programs in order to lessen adolescent drug abuse or the development of any future substance abuse disorders. 

Highlighted in this study was the possible inaccuracy of the conclusions as the results may have been skewed by teenagers merely providing what they thought was a socially acceptable answer. Despite the fact that the majority of states have legalized the use of medical marijuana a stigma against cannabis use remains.

Stigma has and continues to stand in the way of medical research. If the consumption of cannabis were less frowned upon then perhaps more observational studies, studies that relied on self-reporting use, or even appropriate medical treatment, would be improved. The more information that can be gathered, the more accurate the research that can be conducted. In order to fully understand all the benefits and limitations of cannabinoids, although this also applies to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the uninformed stigma must also be eroded.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDStress Increases the Probability of Drug Abuse
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Cannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia

Opioid-Sparing Effects of Cannabinoids on Morphine Analgesia- Participation of CB1 and CB2 Receptors

Researchers have recently provided evidence that synthetic cannabinoids are able to work synergistically with morphine to provide maximum pain relief while limiting opioid doses.

In an effort to control the current opioid epidemic researchers have been looking into the possible benefits of cannabinoids due to the interaction of the opioid and endocannabinoid systems. The results of this study showed that various synthetic cannabinoids (WIN and GP1a) were able to work synergistically with morphine in two separate pain models to maximize analgesic effects. Further evidence is still needed to validate these claims before patient use, but this paper provides further evidence that medical cannabis may help put an end to the opioid crisis. 

Highlighted in this paper is the lingering uncertainty of exact mechanisms within the endocannabinoid system. The authors of this article are left without definite answers as to whether or not the analgesic effect is mediated completely through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or if cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is also involved. Research into cannabinoids is slow within the United States, as there are currently only privately funded studies. This severely limits the medical community from a full understanding. The better a system is understood, the more concrete answers can be found. Critics may never support the rescheduling of cannabis but without moving cannabis to a Schedule II or III, it remains impossible to back even their claims. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia
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Adolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%

Characteristics of Daily E-Cigarette Use and Acquisition Means Among a National Sample of Adolescents

From 2017 to 2018 the amount of middle school and high school electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users increased by 48% and 78% respectively. One of the first studies examining the association between e-cigarette characteristics and daily use among US adolescents is calling for comprehensive tobacco control efforts to reduce e-cigarette and nicotine addiction among adolescents. 38% of adolescent users report using their e-cigarette devices for cannabis which can be hazardous due to the lack of regulation. The potential risks associated with nicotine use and the dangerous misuse of these devices for other substances is putting youth’s health at risk.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDAdolescent E-Cigarette Use Increased by 78%
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Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

Title of study: Cannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study

After legalization in 2018, many Canadian provinces implemented “zero tolerance” policies for drivers who have THC in their systems. But a new study from the University of British Columbia suggests that Canada’s drug-impaired driving laws may be unnecessarily strict. According to researchers, there is no link between THC levels below 5ng/mL and increased risk of car accidents.

Note: Considering the potentially grave risk to life and health for modern culture to make the wrong interpretation of the potential dangers of the effects of cannabis consumption on driving, it is critical for the industry to approach the circumstances with delicacy and diligence. Ideally, everyone involved will be motivated to learn as much as possible about the impact of cannabis on the risks of operating machinery and all will follow a cautious approach which will minimize the risk to all. To that end, it is important to consider and reconcile evidence from multiple perspectives.

The article:

“New study suggests low levels of THC in blood do not increase risk of car crash” https://www.straight.com/cannabis/1256476/new-study-suggests-low-levels-thc-blood-do-not-increase-risk-car-crash#

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This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2IVhSJY    inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis use as a risk factor for causing motor vehicle crashes: a prospective study
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