Synthetic Cannabinoids

New Developments of Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

Title: Novel approaches in clinical development of cannabinoid drugs

A pamphlet has recently been published that highlights new approaches in the clinical development of cannabinoid-based therapies. The pamphlet begins with a look into how current cannabinoids affect patients based on gender, stress, physiological variations, and also delves into how cannabis works on the body in general.

A novel therapy that features an oral version of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a synthetic activator of cannabinoid-receptor-1 (CB1) is explored in this piece and frames it to be a promising future therapy. The pharmacological properties of these two novel therapies were optimized during development after various analysis techniques, forming medications that the authors hope to see in future clinical trials. 

Although the authors remain hopeful that their cannabis-based therapies will reach clinical trials soon, trials featuring cannabinoids are difficult to test in a formal setting because of a dire lack of funding. The federal government still lists cannabis as a Schedule I substance, under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that the federal government does not support the idea that cannabis has any medical use. Considering the legal status of cannabis, only privately-funded studies are able to take place, and unfortunately, that leaves cannabis research in an area of complete bias and prohibitively underfunded. Considering the massive literature supporting a myriad of novel therapeutic benefits, this is a costly reality to the health and well-being of millions.


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Benjamin Caplan, MDNew Developments of Cannabinoid-Based Drugs
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Can specific, isolated Cannabinoids reduce Cannabis Dependency?

Using cannabis to decrease dependency on cannabis? An Australian study shows promise using Nabiximols to target receptors and diminish the rate of relapse. The spray of equal parts CBD and THC had regular smokers smoking 19 fewer days than those on placebo

The News article: http://bit.ly/2YbSrN1

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCan specific, isolated Cannabinoids reduce Cannabis Dependency?
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Cannabinoids Treat Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders

Title: Nabilone administration in refractory chronic diarrhea- a case series

A new study reveals the efficacy of treating chronic gastrointestinal disorders with cannabinoids, such as Nabilone. Researchers followed case studies in which patients were given nabilone which greatly reduced symptoms of chronic diarrhea and weight gain, over a period of three months.

The cannabinoid treatment also reduced the abdominal pain felt by patients and improved their overall quality of life. Considering the favorable safety profile of cannabinoids and the effectiveness demonstrated in the patients, cannabinoids were deemed an appropriate and clinically beneficial method for the treatment of chronic gastrointestinal disorders, such as chronic diarrhea. 

Highlighted by this article are the many symptoms cannabis used to treat before the prohibition of cannabis and the scheduling of the medication under the Controlled Substances Act. Cannabis has been used in eastern medicine, for thousands of years, and used to be a prevalent medication in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and has just recently been re-recognized as an option to treat anorexia associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, and various sleep disorders. Cannabis was once a well-recognized medication, but it has been mercilessly slandered by politicians. The rise and fall of cannabis have largely been politically driven pushes, and the plant and its effects deserve further study to examine the scope and efficacy of its therapeutic benefits. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoids Treat Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders
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Cannabis is a Safe and Effect for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia

Safety and Efficacy of Medical Cannabis in Fibromyalgia 

A recent study has concluded that cannabis is a safe and effective treatment for patients suffering from fibromyalgia symptoms.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and issues sleeping. Cannabis is well known for its ability to treat pain, especially in lieu of opioids as the side effects are minimal and the risk of addiction minimal. This study found that over 200 patients were greatly benefited by cannabis as it moderated their pain and improved their mood. Future studies should aim to directly compare cannabis-based treatment with the currently accepted methods of fibromyalgia treatment to validate efficacy. 

This study highlights how beneficial cannabis can be for those patients who are treatment-resistant for the general treatment of most disorders, especially when pain is involved. Cannabis has been proven to be much safer than opioids, and yet our lack of complete information, concerning the exact mechanisms of the endocannabinoid system and how different cannabinoids act on those mechanisms severely limits our ability to offer practical, novel therapies. Cannabis has previously been shown to be beneficial for treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy and depression, which holds promise when continuing to look for novel treatments for other disorders that have proven difficult to treat. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabis is a Safe and Effect for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia
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Cannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia

Opioid-Sparing Effects of Cannabinoids on Morphine Analgesia- Participation of CB1 and CB2 Receptors

Researchers have recently provided evidence that synthetic cannabinoids are able to work synergistically with morphine to provide maximum pain relief while limiting opioid doses.

In an effort to control the current opioid epidemic researchers have been looking into the possible benefits of cannabinoids due to the interaction of the opioid and endocannabinoid systems. The results of this study showed that various synthetic cannabinoids (WIN and GP1a) were able to work synergistically with morphine in two separate pain models to maximize analgesic effects. Further evidence is still needed to validate these claims before patient use, but this paper provides further evidence that medical cannabis may help put an end to the opioid crisis. 

Highlighted in this paper is the lingering uncertainty of exact mechanisms within the endocannabinoid system. The authors of this article are left without definite answers as to whether or not the analgesic effect is mediated completely through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or if cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is also involved. Research into cannabinoids is slow within the United States, as there are currently only privately funded studies. This severely limits the medical community from a full understanding. The better a system is understood, the more concrete answers can be found. Critics may never support the rescheduling of cannabis but without moving cannabis to a Schedule II or III, it remains impossible to back even their claims. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoids have Opioid-Sparing Effects on Morphine Analgesia
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Video: Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment

A 2018 literature review summarizes the various ways patients can consume cannabis (orally, topically, etc.) and the pain reductions associated with each method. The review focuses on the treatment of multiple sclerosis, cancer, anorexia, arthritis, and other painful disorders.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment
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A systematic review of Safety and effectiveness of cannabinoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia

A 2019 literature review summarizes the finding on using THC and CBD on patients with dementia. Researchers found that Dronabinol and THC were associated with significant improvements in a range of psychiatric scores. Interestingly, cannabis products showed the most promising results in patients whose symptoms were previously unmanageable or resistant to other treatments.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDA systematic review of Safety and effectiveness of cannabinoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia
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Cannabinoids + opioid pain relief: subjective effects in healthy humans

Human study finds that, when taken with opioids, dronabinol (THC) may increase impairment and decrease, or not affect, pain relief. Researchers conclude that THC might NOT protect the body from the adverse effects of opioids. However, the study examined only 10 participants, and such a small sample size should give pause to the validity and applicability of the findings. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDCannabinoids + opioid pain relief: subjective effects in healthy humans
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THC Has Potential for Treating Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

In a crossover trial of 39 patients with Alzheimer’s disease, treatment with nabilone (a synthetic THC analog) was associated with significant improvement in agitation and, remarkably, cognition. Further studies should examine the effects of both THC and CBD in patients with Alzheimer’s disease because anxiety is common in dementia and may exacerbate agitation. 

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Benjamin Caplan, MDTHC Has Potential for Treating Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease
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Dronabinol: antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns

Study provides rigorous data to support clinical evaluation of THC as a low-toxic therapy option in acute leukemia patients. In related work, full-spectrum, natural derivatives of cannabis may work more effectively than their pharmaceutical counterparts.

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Benjamin Caplan, MDDronabinol: antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns
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