All posts tagged: cannabinoids

The Therapeutic Potential of Indenopyrazoles

An overview of the synthetic and medicinal perspectives of indenopyrazoles

In Summary:

 Indenopyrazoles, molecules crucial to many biological signaling pathways, have been found to bind to cannabinoid receptors and seem to exhibit therapeutic properties in a variety of conditions. A review of studies on the molecule describes previously documented antimycobacterial, antipsychotic, anti-tumor, and anti-microbial properties, among others. The molecule has demonstrated moderate affinity for both cannabinoid-1 and cannabinoid-2 receptors, suggesting possible additional anti-inflammatory and anti-neurodegenerative capabilities related to the interactions with these receptors. Further research may uncover additional therapeutic applications and shed light on additional benefits of cannabinoid receptors.

Graphical abstract of actions of indenopyrazoles

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2ZBdDJc   inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Therapeutic Potential of Indenopyrazoles
read more

Another Look Into Opioid and Cannabinoid Interactions

In Summary:

A recent study has revealed that the co-activation of mu-opioid receptors and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) results in the attenuation of the response seen when each receptor type is activated on its own. The decreased response of the two receptor types during co-activation has been implicated in negatively modulating neuritogenesis (the process of generating new brain nerve cells). Neuritogenesis is important for the cells’ ability to receive and project signals leading the researchers to call for more research in order to elucidate the effect this may have on addiction.

The fact that there is co-interaction between opioid receptors and cannabinoid receptors is also interesting to inform the discussion of the place that cannabinoid actors may have in supporting the healing of those who are dependent or addicted to opiate medications.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:  http://bit.ly/2X93OVs      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDAnother Look Into Opioid and Cannabinoid Interactions
read more

Medical Cannabis for Adults Over 50

In Summary:

As with all elements of the aging process, the human endocannabinoid system loses tone over time. Whether it is a reduction in the numbers of cannabinoid receptors or a slow waning of the machinery used to create the signaling molecules that bind to the receptors or the natural senescence of the system that supports all of these normal signaling processes, the fact remains that adults over 50 are best-suited for external support for the endocannabinoid system.

Indeed, the average age at dispensaries is surprising to most who are not familiar with the modern medical cannabis arena. Baby Boomers, perhaps more than any other age group, tend to dominate the medical cannabis dispensaries. This is no new phenomenon, however. Through the ages, across cultures and around the globe, cannabis has been consumed primarily by older adults. Whether by tribe elders, wise councilmen, spiritual leaders, or the educated elite, cannabis has been an integral part of human aging for as long as we have recorded history.

Here, a review out of Israel followed at 184 patients over 65 (average age was 81.2) beginning cannabis treatment. 63.6% were female. “After six months of treatment, 58.1% were still using cannabis. Of these patients, 33.6% reported adverse events, the most common of which were dizziness (12.1%) and sleepiness and fatigue (11.2%). Of the respondents, 84.8% reported some degree of improvement in their general condition.”

Appropriately, the authors advise caution for older adults related to those adults who may be consuming multiple pharmaceuticals, for potential medication interaction effects, as well as nervous system impairment, and increased cardiovascular risk for those who may quire the concern. Wisely, they recommend that “Medical cannabis should still be considered carefully and individually for each patient after a risk-benefit analysis and followed by frequent monitoring for efficacy and adverse events.”

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

At CED Clinic, we have long seen that the average age of medical patients is over 50. Whether for concerns related to sleep, pain, mental or physical health, it seems as though Baby Boomers have either weathered enough politics to have developed a healthy cynicism for the misinformation campaigns of the 1930s and 1970s, or they have direct or indirect experience with cannabis to have learned of its safety and efficacy. Either way, it is quickly reclaiming its historical place in the care of older adults, although oddly… it seems to be a demographic skipped over by the marketing systems of most establishments in the cannabis arena, at least for now.


suggested dose for elderly and cannabis
direction of action for cannabis treatments
bar of significant improvement with cannabis

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2QbJ6yE     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDMedical Cannabis for Adults Over 50
read more

Headache and Migraine Relief Using Cannabis

“Short- and Long-Term Effects of Cannabis on Headache and Migraine “

In Summary:

There are many headache and migraine medications on the market that advertise how they can make you feel better. But what happens when they make you feel worse? Medication overuse headaches occur in 15% of patients taking conventional migraine medication, so it’s no surprise that people are looking for alternatives that bring them relief without reduced risk.

A team of physicians from Washington University wanted to see if cannabis could be a contender. By reviewing data from about 2,000 patients who logged the details of their smoking sessions with the app StrainPrint, researchers were able to see if inhaling cannabis Flower or concentrate could be a solution for headache and migraine relief. They learned that there was, in fact, good reason to be hopeful for the herb.

While concentrates did have a larger reduction in severity rating, there haven’t been enough studies to say it is certainly better than Flower. Overall, inhaled cannabis reduced the severity of migraines and headaches by 50%. Some patients did report needing to use a larger dose for future sessions, indicating the development of tolerance, but the severity of the headaches or migraines wasn’t getting worse or more frequent like what can happen with conventional medications.

In a time when plant-based and all-natural medicines are becoming more sought out, it’s exciting to see medical cannabis is being considered more seriously as a contender. With the positive results from this study, and similar related work will hopefully encourage more physicians (and patients) to explore this centuries-old option.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2P7qiB3     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDHeadache and Migraine Relief Using Cannabis
read more

Flavonoids Proven to be Safe and Effective Treatment for Chronic Venous Disease

Recommendations for the medical management of chronic venous disease- The role of Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction (MPFF)

In Summary:

A recent review has affirmed that treating chronic venous disease with Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction (MPFF) therapy is safe and effective. After reviewing 250 papers, the authors have found a large body of supportive evidence that the MPFF treatment, known as Diosmiplex, is effective for healing venous ulcers on its own or in combination with compression therapy. Diosmiplex, the only MPFF prescribed in the United States, as of 2017, is derived from orange rinds and favorable among patients due to its high safety rating. 

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

Flavonoids are one of the categories of natural compounds produced in nature, including within the innate production system of the cannabis plant. Several patients have reported using strong cannabis topical agents to help venous insufficiency and disease, including conditions such as varicose veins, phlebitis, and post-surgical venous incompetence.

varicose veins picture

Process of leukocyte trapping to tissue degradation
contributing factors to  skin pathology and edema
Genetic and environmental risk factors for CVD
US and European Guideline Recommendations that include flavonoids  and MPFF
Cellular Molecular pathology of venous hypertension
CVI Symptom Assessment
WBC adhesion  with venous hypertension
Recommendations for the use of MPFF in the management of chronic venous disease

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2OUCBQ6     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDFlavonoids Proven to be Safe and Effective Treatment for Chronic Venous Disease
read more

Should Oncologists Recommend Cannabis?

Oncologists Should Recommend Cannabis-Based Medicine for Palliative Care

Oncologists are encouraged to recommend cannabis: cannabis-based medicine for palliative care and more

In Summary:

Earlier this June, a review was published that encourages oncologists to recommend cannabis products to their patients as a safe and effective method of palliative care. The opinion piece highlights how cannabis is a useful treatment for a variety of illnesses (nausea, vomiting, sleep, mood, anxiety), and encourages practitioners to prescribe cannabis for their patients so that they can appreciate the safety and effectiveness of the product.  

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2Dz4UhT      inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDShould Oncologists Recommend Cannabis?
read more

A Synthetic Flavonoid Derivative May Treat Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Regulators and mechanisms of anoikis in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)- a review

In Summary:

Researchers are always exploring new methods to treat highly aggressive forms of breast cancer. As the scientific culture opens up to cannabis as a natural pharmaceutical factory, eyes have been drawn to the individual chemical components born inside cannabis, namely cannabinoids, terpenoids, and flavonoid compounds. Recently, a group stumbled upon a promising synthetic flavonoid derivative. This derivative, named GL-V9, has been found to have an inhibitory effect on the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumors and has shown other anti-metastatic properties. The growth-stopping and anti-spreading effects would address two of the central aspects of TNBC that have thus far made it difficult to treat. The growing understanding of flavonoids and their potential therapeutic benefits seem all but sure to enshrine its place among future research regarding cancer treatments. 

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

In scientific and medical circles, it’s not uncommon to hear the phrase, “everything causes cancer.” It’s often repeated contemptuously, a tongue-in-cheek expression that calls attention to unknowns associated with the spawning and growth of cancers but also bends to the hurricane force of nature’s impact on living organisms. As living biology, cancers are born and thrive while provided sustenance by particular inputs and supports. Because of this fact, there are also innumerable opportunities to stifle or prevent the birth of tumors and many avenues to interrupt its growth or end the life of cancer cells.

The human cultural history has taught all cultures that sleep, exercise, fruits, vegetables, fiber, and water are all required ingredients for sustained, healthy growth. What is it about fruits and veggies that is healthy? They have fiber that is healthy for the human digestive tract, but they also have natural components, terpenes and flavonoids, which support wellness, healing, and the normal cycling (features of both living and dying) of our cells. Cancer represents the inappropriate over-replication of cells. In a sense, the body’s natural ability to end the cells which are not responding to normal signals is lost. If we know that the cannabis factory happens to produce many of the same compounds that are found elsewhere in vegetation and fruits, is it so surprising that we would see cancer-fighting effects?

Breast cancer & flavonoids: current research and treatments
Graphical Abstract: anolkis resistance; breast cancer-related chemsitry

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2OSSCG4     inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDA Synthetic Flavonoid Derivative May Treat Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
read more

Recent Study Reveals Natural Method for Improved Crop Growth (Microbiome!)

Plant-derived coumarins shape the composition of an Arabidopsis synthetic root microbiome

In Summary:

While investigating plant molecules that inhibit parasitic growth, researchers have uncovered a new method for improving crop growth and overall yield. Small molecules, such as flavonoids and coumarins, improve the microbiome of plant roots in order to help them grow and maintain their health. While investigating how the absence of coumarins and flavonoids affect the growth of a common weed the authors stumbled upon a molecular mechanism that will facilitate efforts to grow crops in iron-deficient soils.

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

The natural machinery of Cannabis supports the production of tremendous numbers of flavonoids, coumarins, and microbiome-supporting compounds. Over millennia, cannabis has evolved fastidious attention to detail, and an integral role in the animal ecosystem. Although this natural role has historically been disagreeable to many oppressive movements (religious and cultural), it is nonetheless, self-evident as modern society returns to embrace the science of cannabis. The scientific, medical, textile, farming, nutrition, recreational, and materials construction industries are all wishing only that they had come back to cannabis sooner.

plant microbiome image

the gnotobiotic platform used to investigate the effect of plant metabolism on root microbiome composition
root coumarins shiting the microbial community of plants
root-excluded purified coumarins shiting the microbial community of plants
purified coumarins shiting the microbial community of plants

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/2rtpc9m    inside the CED Foundation Archive

To explore related information, click the keywords below:

Benjamin Caplan, MDRecent Study Reveals Natural Method for Improved Crop Growth (Microbiome!)
read more

CBD sold not quite as advertised

Here’s an argument for the need for accountability in #cannabisindustry. What is sold ought to be closer to what is advertised. Is government regulation the solution? 3rd party transparency? Individual accountability? Court of public opinion?

https://www.leafly.com/news/strains-products/cbd-oil-test-results

What this study found for CBD truth to advertising
tested products that delivered CBD as advertised within a 20% margin
visual of what is advertised vs tested with CBD
Benjamin Caplan, MDCBD sold not quite as advertised
read more

Participants in Cannabis for Chronic Pain Study Describe Life-Changing Results

Restored Self: A Phenomenological Study of Pain Relief by Cannabis

In Summary:

In an Israeli qualitative study investigating the impact of cannabis use on chronic pain patients, all but one of the nineteen study participants experienced pain relief after cannabis use. Participants explained how cannabis allowed them to not just discontinue medications treating their pain, but also medications treating secondary outcomes of their pain, such as poor sleep and anxiety. Patients described feeling “a sigh of relief,” being “reborn” or being saved by cannabis use after years of debilitating pain and medication side effects.

Dr. Caplan and the #MDTake:

The pathway through which cannabis works to combat pain is different from the usual pathways doctors have used for the last 90 years. Prior to the 1930s, cannabis was used routinely, just about everywhere, but political and social agendas kidnapped the medicine and hid it away from most of the mainstream and from routine medical education.

Patients often describe typical pain relievers as adjusting the impact of the pain. Reducing or quieting the pain, softening discomfort, allowing the sufferer to perform previously typical tasks without debilitation or dysfunction. Cannabis, on the other hand, is sometimes described as “taking the sufferer away from the pain,” rather than the other way around. The effects that cannabis can have on the reduction of inflammation, attention, memory, and relaxation, provide a new type of opportunity for relief.

Still, other patients describe the effects of cannabis through a lens of mental focus. Whereas in daily use we typically open a standard set of drawers, some have said, the use of cannabis allows the consumer to open up a different set of draws, and through this adjusted lens, to see discomfort from a different perspective.

For those suffering with chronic pain, years upon years of discomfort, suffering that, when paired with modern medicines, has only met frustration and further discomfort, cannabis is frequently seen as a welcome “sigh of relief.”

different types of  pain
Discussion  from text of research  doc
Sample of text discussing lack of adverse  side effects of cannabis

This paper is also stored here:     http://bit.ly/32FZkUU    inside the CED Foundation Archive

View this review (yellow link) or download:

To explore related information, click the keywords below:


Benjamin Caplan, MDParticipants in Cannabis for Chronic Pain Study Describe Life-Changing Results
read more