All posts tagged: Psychosis

Video: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures

One of the terrific realities of modern Cannabis is that it is possible, and often quite simple, to make effective products at home. With suitable education and access to testing facilities, the soil, nutrients, and plant growth can be supported at home, lab-tested for make-up and potency, as well as safety-checked for potential microscopic contaminants, and ultimately, individualized medicine can be created right at home!

Here is a sample instructional for just one way that cannabis tincture can be made at home. There are countless others and hopefully, many that are yet to be discovered!

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Benjamin Caplan, MDVideo: Do-It-Yourself Cannabis Tinctures
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In Vivo Availability of Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Levels in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis

A 2019 study found that patients with early-stage psychotic disorders had lower levels of CB1-R (Cannabinoid Receptor – 1) compared to healthy individuals. These findings suggest that targeting CB1R with cannabis-based products could potentially treat psychotic disorders. Interestingly, reductions in CB1R levels were associated with greater symptom severity and poorer cognitive functioning but only in male patients. More research is needed into the intersections of gender and psychotic disorders.

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This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2XEkpfV      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDIn Vivo Availability of Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Levels in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis
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Supplementing Antipsychotics with CBD Enhances Psychotic Symptom Treatment

Cannabidiol (CBD) as an Adjunctive Therapy in Schizophrenia: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

Most schizophrenia medications function by blocking the action of the dopamine D2 receptor and effectively treat positive psychotic symptoms, such as delusions or hallucinations, but fail to treat negative psychotic symptoms, such as lack of motivation or the lack of an ability to feel pleasure. Anecdotal evidence has pointed toward the potential for CBD to attenuate psychotic symptoms in conjunction with normally prescribed antipsychotics; additionally, CBD is not hypothesized to act on the D2 receptor, suggesting that it may afford unique advantages over anti-psychotics.

Researchers interested in further exploring this conducted the first known placebo-controlled CBD trial among schizophrenia patients. Although results did not suggest a potential for CBD to treat negative psychotic symptoms, in conjunction with antipsychotics, the CBD group experienced marked lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms. Both the placebo and CBD groups experienced equal levels of treatment-induced adverse events, suggesting that CBD is well-tolerated.

These results suggest that CBD may be effective in treating not only schizophrenia but also psychotic symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease and THC-induced psychosis.

Additional Point: CBD has shown to act in a neuroprotective manner and reduce the psychoactive effects of THC, making it a viable option for patients who have experienced negative side effects with THC.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2WztI04     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDSupplementing Antipsychotics with CBD Enhances Psychotic Symptom Treatment
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The Relationship between Cannabis and Schizophrenia

Cannabis and Psychosis: Are We any Closer to Understanding the Relationship?

Despite the constant technological gains in medicine, there is still insufficient information and knowledge about who is at risk of developing cannabis psychosis prior to an individual’s exposure to cannabis. Controlled research is limited due to the legal status of cannabis but the growing number of states legalizing medicinal and recreational use of cannabis will likely provide a naturalistic experiment that will produce a prevention strategy for the condition. Current schizophrenia research is limited to western male populations and an overemphasis on the biological model; future research should extend to a more diverse population and sociocultural factors that may lead to schizophrenia.

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:   http://bit.ly/2FcDVJR      inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDThe Relationship between Cannabis and Schizophrenia
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High-potency cannabis and incident psychosis: correcting the causal assumption

Scientists offer a strong counter-position to the belief that cannabis causes psychosis, pointing out the difference between correlation and causation. They argue that smoke exposure from any source (including cigarettes) could explain the reported link between cannabis and psychosis. 

View this review (yellow link) or download:

This paper is also stored here:    http://bit.ly/2WHtDr8     inside the CED Foundation Archive

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Benjamin Caplan, MDHigh-potency cannabis and incident psychosis: correcting the causal assumption
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Does cannabis cause psychosis? Evidence is lacking, scientists say

A study in March found that daily use of high-potency cannabis is “strongly linked to the risk of developing psychosis.” But on June 1st, six scientists published a study in The Lancet, a British medical journal, that disputed this claim. The authors of the study note that correlation doesn’t equal causation. In other words, people with schizophrenia may be more likely to use cannabis, but there’s no evidence to suggest that it works the other way around. #psychosis #schizophrenia
The news: http://bit.ly/2WeuM9E
The articles & academic commentary: http://bit.ly/2Wf04wT

Benjamin Caplan, MDDoes cannabis cause psychosis? Evidence is lacking, scientists say
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